How to Find a Good Dog Walker

Although you may get lucky and find the best dog walker in the world posted on a telephone pole, the process of choosing a good, safe and reliable pet care provider can be made easier by starting with these three options.

Where to look for a Good Dog Walker

There are ads all over social media, Kijiji, newspapers and even flyers in your mailbox.  But how do you know where to look for a good dog walker. How do you trust a total stranger with your furry family member?   Although you may get lucky and find the best dog walker in the world posted on a telephone pole, the process of choosing a good, safe and reliable pet care provider can be made easier by starting with these three options.

This post may contain affiliate links.  Although we may make a small commission it is at no cost to you.  See “Disclosure and Legal Things” section for complete details.

Word of Mouth

Start with friends and family. If you have people who are close to you who are dog owners, perhaps they have been in your situation in the past.  They may know someone who is perfect for you.  Having someone who has had first hand experience with a dog walker is comforting.  If your dog parenting practices are similar to the friend’s, you will have a lot more confidence in someone they are recommending than someone you find in a random ad. 

Knowing how to find a good dog walker will help to ensure safe and happy visits for your pup.

Unfortunately, the walker may not have the availability that you require or may not be in your area.  In this instance it would be a good idea for you to has him/her for a recommendation of someone that they know who also does pet care.  Most dog walkers know someone else and most would not recommend anyone who was not reputable. Any walker who has a good reputation would likely only recommend someone who would enhance that reputation, so would not just pass on any name unless they were familiar with the referee’s practices.   It would still be wise to ask if they have ever worked together or how they know each other.  This will give you an idea of how much the two know about each other’s methods. It would be advisable to look at the walker’s website and check the references posted there as well.

Veterinarian’s Office

Many vets will have a bulletin board in the waiting room of their office.  Have a look and see if there are any advertisements.  Many dog walkers will leave advertisements or business cards posted on the bulletin board.  Often, the staff in the vet’s office are familiar with the dog walker.  If you do find a posting, ask the vet staff if they know or would recommend the dog walker.  Although they are not affiliated with or responsible for the actions of the dog walker, they may be able to provide some insight.

Pet Care Agencies

There are many pet care agencies that will provide you with a listing of dog walkers in your area.  When selecting a pet care registry, investigate the company’s reputation.  Do some leg work to be sure they have a solid history and that they offer the services you need. An example of an established network would be Rover.com.  Rover offers pet care options in the United States, Canada and Europe. They require a criminal background check from all of their pet care providers, and provide insured pet care for all bookings through the agency.  I have worked with Rover for almost 2 years and I have met many clients who swear by Rover’s services because of their history, reputation and practices.

If you decide to go through an agency, look for a company in your area that offers biographies and client ratings for their providers.  Many of my pet parents say that the reason they chose me was not only because of my five-star reviews, but because of the number of repeat bookings I have had.  They told me that they felt that having the same clients request my services repeatedly was an indication that I was good with their pets as well as reliable. The more statistics and details you know about a potential walker, the better chance you will find the best care for your pet.

Added Suggestions

After looking, researching and narrowing down the best candidates, you are ready to call and book an interview.  Although you think you have chosen the most perfect candidate, it is wise to call and book an interview with the top 3 or 4 candidates.  A potential walker may look great on paper but you may not be happy with the person that arrives at your door.  This may be due to many reasons including changes in availability since booking your interview, personality conflicts or maybe even a poor reaction by your pup.

Checklist for Finding a Good Dog Walker 

  • Investigate word of mouth referrals, bulletin board posts in trustworthy places (vet’s office) or reputable agencies.
  • Narrow down your search to 3 to 4 potential walkers.
  • Take your time and interview all of the finalists. 
  • Have questions ready.
  • Make notes.
  • Ask for references and actually call the references to get a feel for their perspective about pet care.
  • Review your notes after meeting with all of the walkers. 
  • Compare all references, written and verbal.
  • Make your decision.

Summary

I am neither a veterinarian nor a medical professional. The information in this article has been researched and sourced at the end of the post if required. All safety and medical issues or questions regarding your pet’s health or symptoms should always be brought to the attention of your veterinarian for clarification, assessment, advice and treatment.

If you follow all of these steps your chances of finding someone you are happy with (and more importantly who your doggo is happy with) is pretty strong.  Having said that, be sure to monitor any changes in your pups behavior to be sure all is well.  I also recommend checking in with neighbors to see if they have seen the interaction between your dog and the new walker.  As a pet care provider I also love seeing some form of security system or a FURBO Camera to keep an eye on what goes on inside your home when the walker/sitter is caring for your fur baby.  You can never be too safe!

Dirty Food Bowls Can Make Your Dog Sick

Dirty dog bowls, damaged dog bowls and dog bowls made of certain materials can cause a variety of illnesses for your dog.

Do you have a regular dog bowl cleaning routine?  Many people don’t.  It is not uncommon for pet parents to just refill the bowls daily and occasionally, when it becomes visible, rinse them out to get the residue off.  Let’s face it, dogs eat just about anything (and I mean anything) so a dog bowl can’t  harm them, right?  Wrong!  Dirty food bowls can make your dog very sick.  Actually, dirty dog bowls, damaged dog bowls and dog bowls made of certain materials can cause a variety of illnesses for your doggo. Here is what I have learned about the best dog bowls, the best cleaning methods for you dog bowls and how to wash your dog bowls safely.

This post may contain affiliate links.  Although we may make a small commission it is at no cost to you.  See “Disclosure and Legal Things” section for complete details.

Selecting the Right Dog Bowl

It’s very important that you choose a safe bowl for your dog.  The best option would be stainless steel that is dishwasher safe. It is also best to have at least two sets of bowls so that when one is being cleaned, the other is available to use. 

How Can A Dirty Food Bowl Make Your Dog Sick?

Saliva remains in the bowl after a dog eats.  This, along with the leftover bits of food can act like a Petri dish where germs can grow freely.
Dirty food bowls make your dog sick when food a remain in the bowl. Saliva remains in the bowl after a dog eats. This, along with the leftover bits of food can act like a Petri dish where germs can grow freely.

I am neither a veterinarian nor a medical professional. The information in this article has been researched and sourced at the end of the post if required. All medical issues or questions regarding your pet’s health or symptoms should always be brought to the attention of your veterinarian for clarification, assessment, advice and treatment.

Your dog actually uses his or her tongue to scoop up the food or water from the bowl.  Saliva remains in the bowl along with the leftover bits of food. This can act like a little Petri dish where germs can grow freely.  Gross right? Is it safe to use detergents? How do I clean my pet’s bowls safely?

Many dog parents are afraid to use soaps or detergents in their dog bowls. They are afraid that they will leave a residue that could be consumed by their pet.  Fortunately, this is no more likely to happen to your pet than it would for yourself or your family members after doing the dinner dishes.

Some feel that rinsing the dishes under hot water is the best method.  Unfortunately, a simple rinse under hot water leaves dirt and food particles on your dog’s dishes where bacteria can grow.  This bacterium will be ingested by your dog and can cause some significant health issues.  Because of this, it is crucial that all dog dishes be washed regularly and sanitized a minimum of once weekly.  This is especially imperative if your dog is on a raw food diet. Any raw meat should be removed from the bowl and disinfected after each use. Meat that reaches room temperature is a breeding ground for a number of serious bacteria, including Streptococcus, Listeria and even Salmonella.

How to Safely Wash Your Dog’s Bowls

A study was done in 2011 by NSF International listing the “germiest places in a home”.  Number one on the list was the kitchen sponge.  Number 4 was pet bowls.  This means that the tool most people use to clean the 4th dirtiest item in the home is the 1st most dirty item.  Seems kind of counterintuitive now, doesn’t it? So, what do we do about it? 

Option 1:  Daily

Use your dishwasher when possible.  Any food dish that your dog eats from, should be dishwasher safe.  The dishwasher will sanitize the bowls and provide a safe place to feed your doggo.  I personally prefer to rinse the bowls even after they go through the rinse cycle on the dishwasher in case any dishwashing liquid residue is left behind. 

Option 2: Daily

If you don’t have a dishwasher, or prefer not to use it for your pet bowls, you can use a basin of clean, hot, soapy water.  Wash the bowls with a clean, non abrasive, sponge.  If you are not sure how clean the sponge is, wet it and place it in the microwave for 2 minutes.  This will help to disinfect the sponge, which will in turn keep the sponge from contaminating your dog bowls. 

Wash the bowls thoroughly, making sure to pay close attention to any crevices. Rinse the bowls in hot water to remove the suds, just as you would your household dishes.  Air dry.

Option 1:  Weekly

Even though you are washing your bowls daily, it is recommended that they are given a good disinfecting once a week.  Some suggest that you briefly (one minute maximum) soak the bowls in a bleach and water mixture (always check labels for the safest water to bleach ratio) and rinse in cold water.  It is not recommended that you do this with plastic bowls as bleach can get into the plastic and will not rinse thoroughly.  I personally do not use bleach on my pet’s bowls. I am not comfortable using chemicals of that strength near my dog’s food. Although I know it’s been rinsed well, I prefer a more natural alternative.

Option 2:  Weekly

If you prefer not to use bleach, the alternative recommendation would be to use a vinegar and water mixture, followed by a thorough rinse in warm water. The recommended ratio is 2 parts water to 1 part vinegar.

How can Water Affect My Dog Bowls?

Depending on where you live, your plumbing and water filtration system, the effect you water has on the dog bowls is something to be considered.  Calcium build up creates a crusty rim on the bowl that doesn’t come off very easily.  Using an abrasive sponge is not a good idea as it can scratch the bowl and leave it vulnerable to bacteria, so it is best to use the previously mentioned vinegar/water mixture.  Soaking in this solution will help break down the residue, leaving the bowl smooth and shiny.

Wrapping it all up!

  • Dirty food bowls make your dog sick because of food residue and saliva.
  • Using a stainless steel, dishwasher safe food bowl is the best option.
  • Sterilizing in the dishwasher is the best cleaning method.
  • If washing by hand, make sure the sponge/cloth is new or sterilized before use.
  • Rinse with a vinegar/water solution and rinse with warm water weekly to thoroughly disinfect the bowls.
  • Have multiple bowls so that you can swap them out when the others are being cleaned.
  • Use the vinegar/water solution to remove calcium build up and hard water stains from your dog’s bowl.

Why Do Some Dog Breeds Have Their Tails Cut Off?

One method of tail docking is performed when a puppy is between 2 and 5 days old. The breeder uses surgical scissors to cut off the puppy’s tail without anesthetic.

I was playing with one of my favorite neighborhood dogs the other day.  He is a beautiful Boxer with the sweetest disposition and is the patriarch of the neighborhood dogs.  He has not been neutered, but he has no tail.  I asked his owner why he would have one of the procedures done and not the other, and why he chose tail docking.  His response was that the breeder had done it before he adopted his dog.  He wasn’t even offered the option.  I have heard this before, from a client who owns a Golden Doodle.  She said she wasn’t even aware that there was a choice until after she had picked up her puppy.  This made me wonder why some dog breeds have their tails cut off?  What is the reasoning behind the procedure and how it benefits the dog?

I decided to do some research and came up with some surprising information.  I had always assumed that was supposed to have some kind of medical benefit, but why?  Here is what I discovered:

I am neither a veterinarian nor a medical professional. The information in this article has been researched and sourced at the end of the post. All medical issues or questions regarding your pet’s health or symptoms should always be brought to the attention of your veterinarian for clarification, assessment, advice and treatment.

What is Tail Docking and how is it done?

Tail Docking, also known as Tail Bobbing or Tail Cutting, is the process of removing most of a dog’s tail at the base.  There are 3 methods of removal. 

The first is performed by the breeder.  A strong rubber tie is wrapped around the tail.  This cuts off the circulation from the body to the tail.  The part of the tail beyond the tie is expected to fall off after a few days.  This has to be performed when the puppy is between 2 and 5 days old.

Some dog breeds have their tails cut off (Tail Docking) because they are working dogs, but most have it done for aesthetic reasons. Many owners don't even know  how the tail is removed or that Tail Docking is an option.
Some dog breeds have their tails cut off (Tail Docking) because they are working dogs, but most have it done for aesthetic reasons. Many owners don’t even know how the tail is removed or that Tail Docking is an option.

The second method, also performed by a breeder when the puppy is between 2 and 5 days old, is performed by cutting off the puppy’s tail using surgical scissors. Neither of these two processes involve the use of anesthetic and the puppies are awake.  Because of the circulation to the tail at this age, stitches are not usually necessary. 

The third method involves a veterinarian.  This is done when the dog is over 8 weeks old. The vet will place the puppy under anesthetic and use a scalpel to remove the tail.  The skin at the base of the tail is pulled over the open wound and held together with stitches.

According to the RSPCA and many other studies, any of these processes cause considerable pain at the time of removal and can result in long term pain as well as associated medical, emotional and social issues.

In 1996 The University of Queensland did a study of 50 puppies.  This was included in their findings:

“The behaviour of 50 puppies of traditionally docked breeds was recorded during and after the procedure of tail docking at the University of Queensland Companion Animal Veterinary Hospital. The behaviours were recorded at the time of the procedure and then in 5 second intervals for the first minute followed by 10 second intervals until the pup settled to sleep. All puppies vocalised intensely (‘shrieking’) at the time of amputation of the tail, averaging 24 shrieks (range of 5 to 33).”

Read more here:  https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:712177

History of Tail Docking

Tail docking began many centuries ago.  Dogs were not pets in the sense that they are today.  Although still considered companions, most were working dogs. They were used for herding on farms or as hunting dogs.  On a farms, dogs would round up cattle or sheep. Because of their close proximity to the larger animals as well as their exposure to machinery, it was felt that their tails were subject to injury. It was thought that removing the tail was a preventative measure to ensure the dog’s safety.

A hunting dog had the potential to engage in fights with other animals.  It was felt that the tail provided a disadvantage as the opponent had something to grab on to, leaving the dog vulnerable. In both cases there was also the concern that if these dogs got too dirty, there could be issues with infection. In later years, when employed as police or guard dogs, this same principle of the dog being vulnerable applied, and the tails were removed for these working dogs.

This post may contain affiliate links.  Although we may make a small commission it is at no cost to you.  See “Disclosure and Legal Things” section for complete details.

Current Reasons for Tail Docking:

For working dogs in the military, on the police force or on farms, the reason for tail docking continues to be for the safety of the dog.  Many dogs who do not work also have their tails docked.  This is often for aesthetic reasons.  The owners feel the dog looks better without a tail or that this provides a look that is familiar to the breed.  Tail docking, for some breeds, has been a requirement for some show dogs to be allowed to compete. 

There is also the belief that it is required.  Many people who are purchasing dogs from breeders are not even aware that tail docking is an option.  The breeders perform the docking and sell the pups already altered.  The owners, in a number of cases, are not even aware of the reasoning behind the removal of the tail, the process by which it is removed nor the potential hazards associated with it.

Which Breeds Most Commonly Dock Tails?

Only certain breeds customarily have their tails removed.  These include:  Dobermans, Rottweilers, Boxers, Cocker Spaniels, Schnauzers and Poodles.  The American Kennel Club has identified over 60 breeds that are known to have docked tails.

NOTEWORTHY:

In most areas of Canada and the US, tail docking has not been banned.  In many countries the procedure is banned or, at the very least, must be performed by a veterinarian and a medical or ohttps://dogsbestlife.com/home-page/dog-health-docked-tails/ther suitable reason is required before the surgery is performed.

What to Do When Dogs Fear Face Masks

When dogs fear face masks it can be traumatizing just to go for their daily walks.

As the world changes and people begin to come out of isolation, we will be changing many of our daily habits and routines.  One of the most common new things is that many will be wearing face masks to protect themselves and others.  While we are learning to adapt and communicate with our faces covered, our dogs may be very confused by the inability to see facial expressions.  Dogs may be stressed when they see people sporting their new fashion masks.  So, what do we do?  When dogs fear face masks it can be very traumatic when passing someone on the street or when her owner walks in the door looking like Darth Vader.  I found a few hints and tips to help your doggo adapt and to feel comfortable with this new reality.

This post may contain affiliate links.  Although we may make a small commission it is at no cost to you.  See “Disclosure and Legal Things” section for complete details.

Tip #1:  Make masks a common household item.

If you have a few masks (or even just one), you can leave them around the house in plain sight.  Placing them in areas that are familiar to your dog including her sleeping area, hanging from a chair in the kitchen or dining room, on the hook where you hang your keys or even wrapped around her treat bag.  By placing the masks where your dog can see them, they become routine, day to day items.  This will offer some familiarity and reduce the element of surprise.

Tip #2:  Let him sniff the mask.

If you hold the mask and let him sniff it, he can see that it is just another object and not something to be guarded against or feared.  Becoming acquainted with the unknown can ease stress.

Tip #3:  Put your mask on in front of your dog.

If you put your mask on in one room and then walk into the room where your dog is, he may be shocked or outright scared.  Remove the element of surprise by putting the mask on while your dog watches.  She will see the transition from the real you to the masked you and the transition will be smoother.  By seeing that it’s you “getting dressed” the level of fear will be reduced.

Tip #4:  Wear your mask around the house.

Now that your dog has watched you put the mask on, try wearing it around the house.  Wear it while you play a game of fetch. Enjoy a brief training session or a belly rub with your mask on. By doing this she will make the correlation that masks are for good times.  Just wearing it around the house while going about your day, will make the mask common place.

Tip #5:  Use treats to associate a potentially scary thing with a positive thing.

If you give your dog a treat when you hold the mask, when you put it on or when you are wearing it, he will associate the mask with good things.  When you are walking your dog and he sees other humans with their masks on, have some treats ready before you cross paths. As you and your pup approach people you can give your dog a small treat before the shock or fear of seeing the masked people occurs.

Note:  Dogs will not be able to read facial expressions through the mask.  They will only see eyes.  Using soft praise, gentle tones and attempt to make your eyes speak rather than your smile. It will help you to communicate with your pup in a new way.

When dogs fear face masks you can help by having a small treat ready on your walks. You can give him one before approaching masked people.

Not all dogs will be afraid.  Some won’t even be fazed by the change.  Those that are nervous, new to your household and adapting, coming from bad situations or who are just generally skittish will need some extra time to get used to the changes going on around them. When dogs fear face masks it can be traumatizing just to go for their daily walks. By using the ideas listed above, you can help to make this transition a pleasant one.

I am neither a veterinarian nor a medical professional. The information in this article has been researched and sourced at the end of the post. All medical issues or questions regarding your pet’s health or symptoms should always be brought to the attention of your veterinarian for clarification, assessment, advice and treatment.

The Best Dog Toys for Strong Chewers

My dog loves to chew. He loves to find the weakest part of a toy, rip the seam and take all of the stuffing out. I am excited when a toy lasts more than three days. Finding long lasting dog toys for strong chewers is not an easy task.

Dogs love to chew. Some have a very strong chew reflex and will go through a plush toy in no time. Finding long lasting dog toys for strong chewers is not an easy task

My dog loves to chew. He loves to find the weakest part of a toy, rip the seam and take all of the stuffing out.  I am excited when a toy lasts more than three days.  Besides being expensive, this habit can be concerning as he tends to swallow the stuffing.  I am always afraid he will choke or develop some kind of intestinal blockage.  In the two years since I adopted Zorro I have found some of the best dog toys for strong chewers.  Some have even lasted the entire two years!

This post may contain affiliate links.  Although we may make a small commission it is at no cost to you.  See “Disclosure and Legal Things” section for complete details.

I have put together a list of some of the most durable toys that I have found for dogs that love to chew and destroy!

Kong Classic Dog Toy

As many of you know, the Kong Classic will withstand the strongest of teeth.  It can be used for interactive play such as a rousing game of fetch, a self-entertaining chew toy when left alone, or you can add treat to the center to make a brain exercising puzzle that will keep your pup busy for quite a while.

They come in various sizes so mouths of every age, shape and size can enjoy.  They even have a specific size and texture suitable for senior or small dogs.

Extreme Ball

Kong offers a ball that is great for playing or chewing.  Because it is actually round, as opposed to the classic toy, it rolls well and allows your dog to play a more traditional game of fetch. It provides a great opportunity for keeping that busy jaw entertained.  My dog will go through a tennis ball in a matter of minutes, but the Extreme Ball will keep him working for hours and still stand strong!

Puppy Binkie

Got a teething puppy?  Kong has an answer for that as well.  The Puppy Binkie is a helpful training tool as well as a fun way to keep your puppy busy.  A teething puppy can (and will) find anything in your house to chew on.  I am sure many of you have experienced the chewed shoe when you were getting dressed or a few tooth prints on the edge of your coffee table or base boards.  Having this teething toy as a resource will help your puppy an save your home at the same time.  It also has a space for hiding treats so that your puppy can spend time solving puzzles and  stimulating her brain.

Kong Wubba

I actually discovered this toy through one of my clients.  They have two Shetland Sheep dogs.  One is a senior and the other is 3 years old.  Both dogs love to play, and fetch is the game of choice.  I would visit three times daily and play fetch for 30 minutes with these two and their Wubba.  They would race each other, chew it until it squeaked, wrestle to get the toy away from each other and bring it back.  11 months later, when I returned to work for this family for another week, this same Wubba was there, front and center in their toy room.  It was well worn, but still completely intact.  I was impressed.

Kong Goodie Bone

This is a great alternative to giving your dog a bone.  As bones can cause damage to your dog’s teeth or intestinal blockage and tears, choosing a strong chewing alternative is the best option.  The Kong bone is shaped like a regular bone, allowing the dog to manipulate it in the same way she would a natural bone.  The ability to add treats to the centers offers a the flavored bonus of a natural bone as well.

West Paw Zogoflex Hurley Durable Dog Bone

This bone shaped toy is firm and extremely durable.  It provides the opportunity for the same chewing action as a bone, so your dog will apply her natural chewing instincts.  My dog has been chewing on this bone for over a year and there are only a few minor tooth marks in it.  Although I have never used it in this manner, the company claims it floats. Should you be planning a day at the beach it is best to play with a toy that does not hold water.  In a salt water environment this is a great way for your dog to play while avoiding ingesting salt water, which can cause serious illness.

Dog Rope Toy

A strong, thick rope toy with large, firm knots will provide your dog with plenty of chew time.  You can play fetch, hide and seek, or tug of war with your pup.  This rope is extremely durable.  We have two; one long one and one about 8 inches long. We have had both for almost 2 years.  Zorro loves to play with it.  He flings in in the air and chases it all by himself.  Other times, he just holds it with his front paws and gnaws on it until he uses up all of his chewing energy. 

K9 Tough Guard Elephant

There are a number of K9 Tough Guard Plush Toys available, and I can only conclude that they are all as durable as the elephant.  My dog has had his little purple friend for about 14 months now and, although it is quite tattered, this is the first squeaky toy (called a Squiggen in our house) that has ever lasted more than a week.  He plays with it daily.  It is the toy he brings to the door when we return from work.  He squeaks in routinely and often sits quietly chewing on it.  It is the most durable plush toy he has ever had.

Finding long lasting dog toys for strong chewers is not an easy task.  The Kong name is well established as one of the best for chew toys, but there are still some surprising little gems to be found out there.  If you have any recommendations for durable dog toys, please add them in the comment section. My doggo would love to try something new!

Jobs Working with Animals

There are many ways to spend your days at jobs working with animals while earning a decent living. Even the jobs that require little or no education can provide a substantial income.

Have you been trying to decide what jobs you can do that let you work with animals? Depending on your current skills, whether or not you want to attend school or even if you would like to do something on your own, there are a number jobs working with animals.

This post may contain affiliate links.  Although we may make a small commission it is at no cost to you.  See “Disclosure and Legal Things” section for complete details.

Here is a list of ideas if you are considering a career with animals:

Veterinarian:

A veterinarian is responsible for the medical care of people’s pets.  It requires 6 years of University as well as a Veterinary License.  You can work in a veterinary hospital or in a veterinary practice for someone else. Other employment options include animal rescues, zoos (requires additional studies for exotic animals) or you can open your own practice.

Veterinary Technician:

Veterinary Technicians work alongside veterinarians. They assist with preparing animals for surgery, doing lab work and caring for animals pre and post-surgery. Some also provide basic dental care.  Becoming a Vet Tech requires a 2-year education.  Vet Techs are employed at veterinary practices, veterinary hospitals, animal rescues and zoos (requires additional studies). 

Veterinary Assistant

A Veterinary Assistant is responsible for the basic care of the animals in a veterinary hospital.  They assist with the care and recovery of pre and post operative pets. Duties include ensuring the kennels are thoroughly cleaned, the dogs are walked and that they have been fed according to veterinary instruction. They perform any general care responsibilities required for the animals.  Vet Assistants may be asked to perform some of the office work, make phone calls to pet parents, book appointments and take payments.

Pet Store Associate

As a pet store associate, you would work with the animals in the store as well as serve customers.  You will learn about the care and feeding needs of a variety of animals. The job includes assisting people with the needs of their own pets. You may also provide instructions regarding the pets that they are purchasing.  You may work as a cashier or stocking shelves, or a combination of a variety of these duties. Usually, the only education required is a high school diploma or equivalent.

Dog Trainer

A dog trainer assists pet owners with the training of their puppies or adult dogs.  In some cases, you may be training a support, service or guide dog. These require very specific skills as they will be working with people who have physical and emotional challenges.  Dog training requires no formal education. Most learn through apprenticeship programs that provide on-the-job learning. There are online training courses to gain a basic understanding of the job, followed by practical training.  It takes many hours to develop the skills needed to work with the animals as well as the people who care for them.

Pet Groomer

A pet groomer will bathe and cut your pet’s fur/hair. They will remove matting, clip nails, clean ears and, in some cases, express anal glands to avoid impaction.  A dog groomer can work in association with a veterinary practice, at a grooming salon or in a pet store. They can choose to work out of their own home or even have a mobile service set up with a modified van.  There are many self-employment opportunities once you have the necessary experience caring for the animals. It is also important to learn how to interact with the pet parents.

The education required can be obtained via an online certification program. This includes a practical placement guided by an established groomer. An apprenticeship program with an established groomer is a very common way to learn grooming skills. Another option is by working in a pet store that provides grooming where you could train with the in-house grooming staff. 

Pet Sitter

Many people struggle to find pet care for their animals when they are out of town.  There are a lot of pets that do not do well in a shelter or with other animals. The best solution for them is to stay in their own home.  Pet parents will hire an individual to stay in their home and provide full time care for their pets. 

There is no formal education required for this position. Usually you would have to have some pet care experience, a referral from someone who knows your animal care background and a criminal background check. It is also recommended that you have pet care business insurance to cover you for liability.  You can find jobs through agencies or create your own business through advertising and word of mouth. 

Doggy Daycare

Doggy Daycares are becoming very popular.  These are places where people can bring their dogs to be cared for during the day. Many offer overnight stays or boarding while the famiily is away.  Working in a doggy daycare does not require a formal education, but experience with animals is a bonus.  You can be trained on-the-job to gain this experience. 

Home doggy daycares are a self-employment option if you have the space for the dogs to move around and play in the house as well as a big enough yard for them to get some exercise.   Experience caring for groups of dogs is recommended as it requires a lot of organization and supervision. Most jobs working with animals will require a criminal background check. Pet care insurance would be advisable when caring for other people’s pets.

If you prefer not to fully run your own business, you can register with an agency like Rover.com who will connect you with people searching for daycare or boarding for their pets as well as insure your business.  You will still choose your own rates, hours and clients, but you will spend less time and money on advertising and insurance.

Dog Walker
Jobs working with animals include  grooming, dog walking, boarding and doggy daycare.
Jobs working with animals include dog walking, boarding and doggy daycare.

A dog walker will travel from home to home picking up the dog and taking him/her for a daily walk.  These walks may be individual or as a group.  It takes some experience to build up to groups of 5, so you should start with one or two and when you become confident, add more.

There are many agencies, such as Rover.com that connect the families with a suitable walker.  You can register with one of these agencies or you can own and operate your own dog walking business.  The agency will require some pet care experience, a few references and a criminal background check.  In exchange for a percentage of your hourly rate, they will pay for you to be insured and provide you with many leads to people who require pet care.  You will still choose your own rates, hours, days and clients, but without the added pressure of advertising and insurance payments.

Pet Photographer

It is becoming more and more popular to have pet portraits taken. People want specialized cards for Christmas, Mother’s Day, Birthdays or Valentine’s Day.  Pet photographers are hired for advertising, social media and marketing campaigns.  The ability to capture great pet photographs will provide you with the opportunity to sell them. You can sell on various platforms including Adobe Stock, Shutter Stock, Dreamstime or Getty Images.  You can work for yourself or you can find a job working for a photography studio.

Pet Treat Baker

Into baking?  Creating healthy, homemade dog treats can be a great business.  You can open your own shop or work from home.  This would require that your kitchen pass health and safety requirements.  As pet-oriented shops are opening in a number of cities, this business may allow you to find a job as an associate or baker in one of these locations.

Pet Massage Therapist

Many pets, especially rescues, are very anxious.  They find it difficult to relax.  They may be very sensitive to touch, depending on their experiences. Massage helps the animals to relax and learn to trust the touch of a human hand. It will also provide relief to pets with medical issues such as arthritis or hip dysplasia.  Massage will help an animal in the same ways that it helps a human. You may also work with pet parents to show them how they can massage their pets to help them to become comfortable at home. 

There is no specific education or licensing requirements for pet massage therapy. Online courses are available as well as the option to be an apprentice. By working with an experienced therapist you will learn the best practices. Employment opportunities are found in pet massage clinics. Once you have acquired the proper skills and experience you could open your own business. It is recommended that you obtain the proper insurance with any form of self-employment.

Doga Instructor

Recently, I am hearing more and more about Doga.  This is a form of yoga that you practice with your pet.  If you are already a yoga instructor, you can provide Doga classes for people and their dogs.  If you would like to become a Doga instructor, you can take a 200 or 400 hour online yoga instructor training course.  Once you become a yoga instructor, you can incorporate Doga into your classes. There are jobs available in yoga studios or in gyms. Once you have gained experience and are aware of the business requirements, you could opt to open your own studio. Some instructors choose to provide online courses for people who prefer practicing at home.

Pet Blogger

If you have a lot of experience with pets you can start a pet blog.  You can teach others if you are passionate about pet care and needs. If you enjoy writing you can share your knowledge and experiences about the various pets you have cared for.  You can write about any jobs you have had working with animals. Your niche can be about many pets or a very specific species. You could also choose a niche that revolves around pets, such as pet foods or grooming.  Many people who provide a service for pets also run a blog about their experiences. These blogs offer information to pet parents who may have questions or concerns about their pet’s care. 

Creating a blog takes only a few minutes and has very few costs associated with start-up.  You can make a part-time or full-time income from a blog.  Your earnings will depend on the time you have available to devote to your blog. This includes writing informative content and promoting it to an audience of pet parents.

There are many ways to spend your days at jobs working with animals while earning a decent living.  Even the jobs that require little or no education can provide a substantial income.  Many, such as grooming, walking, massage, Doga or baking, can be done on a part-time or flexible basis while attending school or working another job.

My Dog has Dandruff

There are several possible causes and symptoms of dandruff in dogs. If you see flakes on your pup or on any surface where he has been resting, be sure to look for further symptoms. Contact your vet and have your dog properly inspected to rule out any underlying medical conditions.

I was giving my dog, Zorro, a massage the other day.  His black coat is shiny and smooth, but I noticed that he had many little white flakes all over his back.  At first, I thought it was dust and wondered where he would have been to get covered in dust.  I looked a little closer, brushed back his fur a little and realized that it was coming from his skin.  My dog has dandruff.  I hadn’t seen this before so I set out to learn the causes and symptoms of dandruff in dogs.

I am neither a veterinarian nor a medical professional. The information in this article has been researched and sourced at the end of the post. All medical issues or questions regarding your pet’s health or symptoms should always be brought to the attention of your veterinarian for clarification, assessment, advice and treatment.

Is dandruff a common occurrence for dogs? 

Dandruff is common in dogs.  You may notice it on your dog’s fur, although it is more difficult to see on a lighter colored dog.  You may also see it on your dog’s bed, blankets, coat, car seat, harness or on your furniture.  If you discover that your doggo has dandruff, it is important to narrow down the cause so that it can be treated appropriately. 

What are the potential causes?
 There are many causes and symptoms of dandruff in dogs, They range from environmental to more serious underlying medical issues.
There are several possible causes and symptoms of dandruff in dogs. They range from environmental to more serious underlying medical issues..

Dry Climate

Allergic Reaction

Diet is missing something – Often Omega 3 or Omega 6

Grooming – Too much or too little

Stress

Infection – Fungal and Bacterial

Hypothyroidism

Mange

Seborrhea

Because of the wide range of symptoms and causes of dandruff in dogs, it is important to narrow down the environment(s) that your dog has been in recently. Learning the source will help to find the appropriate treatment.  If your dog is showing any other symptoms, seek the advice of your veterinarian immediately as there may be a more serious underlying cause.  Early detection and diagnosis of any pet ailment or concern is key to having the best chance of recovery without permanent damage.

This post may contain affiliate links.  Although we may make a small commission it is at no cost to you.  See “Disclosure and Legal Things” section for complete details.

If the only symptom is dandruff, here are some questions to help narrow down the possible sources of your pup’s dandruff:

Has the weather become dryer or has the heat in your home been turned on recently?

Weather changes to dryer conditions or the furnace in your home running can cause your dog’s skin to dry out.  This would cause flaking and itching.

Has your dog eaten anything new?

Food allergies are common and can result in itchy, dry, flaky skin. If you have changed your dog’s food, treats or if he has managed to get into the garbage, he could be having an allergic reaction

Have you changed anything in your home or yard (cleaning products, plants, garden)?

Has your dog been laying on your freshly cleaned carpet or furniture?  Has he been rolling on the lawn after a treatment?  If so, his skin may be irritated.  Even the use of new laundry detergent or fabric softeners on bedding, dog coats or your own clothes can be a skin irritant.

Is your dog’s diet rich in Omega 3 and Omega 6?

These two fatty acids benefit the dog’s skin.  If your dog food is lacking in either or both of these nutrients, he may develop a skin irritation resulting in dandruff.  The best source of Omegas is directly from foods, but your vet may recommend a supplement to add to your dog’s daily routine.

How often do your bathe and groom your dog?

If you bathe your dog frequently, you may be accidentally drying his skin.  Shampoos, soaps and hair dryers can take their toll on a dog’s skin leaving it dry and flaky.

Has something changed in his daily routine or in the home?

If your dog is upset, if his little world has been disrupted in any way, he may be stressed.  Something as simple as moving his bed, or location of his dish can cause anxiety for some doggos. If his human’s work routine has changed, a new family member has arrived (human or fur), or if someone in the house is stressed or sick, your dog may be feeling anxious. Stress is a common cause of dandruff.

Does your dog have visible skin irritation?

If your dog has fleas, a recent cut or if he has food allergies, the skin can develop a fungal or a bacterial infection.  Consult a vet if your dog’s skin appears red, crusty, has bald or thinning patches of fur, or of he has an unusual odor.  All are signs of infection. These skin infections can cause dandruff.  

Has your dog’s once smooth, shiny coat become dull and coarse?

These are a couple of the symptoms of hypothyroidism.  He may be itchy and develop sores. He may begin shedding more than usual.  There are many other symptoms of hypothyroidism, including ear infections, fatigue and aversion to cold.  It is important to have this condition diagnosed and treated by a veterinarian immediately.

Does your dog have mites?

Mites can cause many types of skin irritations including itching, hair loss and dandruff.  If you suspect mites, have your dog tested and treated.  Some species of mites can be transmitted to humans and other pets. Some species of mites result in mange, another skin disease found in animals and birds.

Is your dog’s flaky skin located mainly on the face, and torso?

These areas contain sebaceous glands.  If the dandruff that your dog is experiencing is predominantly in these areas, he may have a skin condition called Seborrhea. The skin will appear red and flaky.  Your dog will also be itchy.  This is another condition where your dog might develop an odor.  Once diagnosed, a veterinarian will be able to recommend shampoos or medication to clear it up.

There are several possible causes and symptoms of dandruff in dogs.  If you see flakes on your pup or on any surface where he has been resting, be sure to look for further symptoms.  Contact your vet and have your dog properly inspected to rule out any underlying medical conditions.  Have a list prepared for the veterinarian.  The list should include all foods and treats that he has consumed, any recent changes in the home, any contact with other animals, bathing routines, soaps, shampoos, cleansers and detergents used in the home, and anything unusual behavior that you may have noticed recently. Any insight into the cause will assist with the diagnosis.

Sources

https://www.hillspet.com/dog-care/healthcare/dog-dandruff-facts-and-prevention

https://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2018/02/14/dog-dandruff.aspx

https://pets.webmd.com/dogs/ss/slideshow-skin-problems-in-dogs

https://www.petcarerx.com/article/the-causes-of-dog-and-cat-dandruff/650

https://www.petmd.com/dog/nutrition/coconut-oil-dogs-understanding-benefits-and-risks

https://www.petmd.com/dog/conditions/skin/c_multi_pyoderma

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/321379

Xylitol: The Danger for Dogs

Xylitol poses significant danger for dogs. It does not take a lot of it to make your dog sick, and when it is consumed, is does not take long before symptoms occur.

Xylitol poses significant danger for dogs.  It does not take a lot of it to make your dog sick. When it is consumed, it does not take long before symptoms occur.  Because it is found in many everyday products you may not even be aware that your dog has ingested it.

This post may contain affiliate links.  Although we may make a small commission it is at no cost to you.  See “Disclosure and Legal Things” section for complete details.

I did some research to learn more about what Xylitol is, where it comes from, how it is used in our foods and other household products and how it will affect our pups should they swallow any.

What is Xylitol?

Xylitol is a sugar alcohol and is used as a sugar substitute in many foods.  It looks like regular sugar but has significantly fewer calories. It is derived from various fruits and vegetables and is also found in certain types of wood.

There are several natural sources of Xylitol including:
  • Strawberries
  • Raspberries
  • Cauliflower
  • Mushrooms
  • Oats
  • Corn on the cob
  • Birchwood

Because Xylitol has a lower caloric content than sugar it is used in the production of many calorie reduced foods.  It is a source of sweetener for a diabetic diet or a calorie reduced weight loss plan. It can also be found in medications and oral care products.  Xylitol has even been identified as an effective agent against oral bacteria. This results in reduced cavities and is thought to lower the incidents of tooth decay.

Xylitol can be found in the following common household items:
  • Chewing Gum
  • Mints
  • Sugar Free or Calorie Reduced Candies
  • Peanut Butter
  • Jams
  • Honey
  • Syrup
  • Fruit Drinks
  • Sugar Free Gelatine
  • Sugar Free Pudding
  • Toothpaste
  • Oral Care Rinses
  • Nasal Spray
  • Cough Syrup
  • Cough Drops
  • Vitamins
  • Prescription Medications
  • Formulas Used in Feeding Tubes

All these potential sources are found in the average household’s pantries and cabinets. Because of this it is important to be sure you are keeping them all away from your dog.  A dog consuming just a little can be extremely harmful. If you suspect that your dog has come into contact with something containing Xylitol get him to the vet immediately. 

When you are not in the house it’s important to remember that people toss chewing gum on the ground. It is not uncommon to spill mints or candies when sharing them among friends.  Garbage cans get blown around and the contents are scattered over parks, trails, sidewalks and lawns.  I see this daily when dog walking, in all neighborhoods. Dogs are quick to pick things up.  You may not even see it happen. It can take less than an hour and up to half a day to begin seeing the effects of Xylitol poisoning. 

I am neither a veterinarian nor a medical professional. The information in this article has been researched and sourced at the end of the post. All medical issues or questions regarding your pet’s health or symptoms should always be brought to the attention of your veterinarian for clarification, assessment, advice and treatment.

If you see any of the following symptoms contact your veterinarian immediately. Your dog may have ingested something you are unaware of.

Symptoms of Xylitol poisoning in Dogs:
Foods and gum containing Xylitol can be found on the ground during walks. Be sure to watch what your dog is sniffing.
  • Lethargic
  • Lack of Coordination
  • Vomiting
  • Weakness
  • Tremors
  • Seizures
  • Hypoglycemia
  • Liver Failure
  • Coma
Is there a Cure?

If you can reach your veterinarian quickly, they may be able to offer an IV drip that will help to restore your dog’s glucose levels. Extensive liver damage may result in death.

Because of the severity and the rapid deterioration that occurs with Xylitol poisoning, the best method of protecting your dog is prevention.   Here are some things to consider:

  • Keep all foods and oral products in cabinets above the dog’s reach.
  • Do not give your dog table scraps or leftovers. Xylitol is an ingredient in many foods.
  • Provide only treats prepared specially for dogs.
  • Do not let children eat unsupervised around your dog.  Food that is dropped may go unnoticed. Children may just want to give their furry friend a treat.
  • Keep backpacks, purses, jackets, suitcases or bags containing gum, mints, candies, drinks etc. zipped up and out of reach.
  • Keep a close eye on what your dog is sniffing when on a walk.  Even though it is important to let your dog sniff, it is equally important to keep their noses where you can see them.
  • Keep garbage cans covered securely, inside the home and out.

The best defense is a good offense.  Taking steps to avoid an issue is always safer.

Sources:

https://www.vets-now.com/pet-care-advice/dangers-of-xylitol-for-dogs/

https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-996/xylitol

https://ca.iherb.com/pr/xlear-inc-xclear-xylitol-saline-nasal-spray-fast-relief-1-5-fl-oz-45-ml/7047?gclid=EAIaIQobChMInu6dtdv66AIVBK7ICh1hVAzyEAAYAiAAEgIxVfD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/xylitol-101#dental-health

Why is My Dog’s Stomach Gurgling?

Gurgling, also known as borborygmi or Borborygmus, occurs when the dog’s digestive system is processing food. Quiet noises coming from the abdomen are normal. Louder noises can be normal as well, or they can be a symptom of something more serious.

The other night I woke when my dog became restless.  Zorro rarely wakes in the night so I was a bit concerned, although he seemed fine.  He had some water and got back in bed.  Then I heard my dog’s stomach gurgling.  It was quite loud.  He was having trouble sleeping so I thought maybe he had to go out.  I let him out in the yard, but after several minutes he still hadn’t done anything and was happy to go back inside.  After returning to bed, his stomach was still rumbling quite loudly.  I massaged his tummy for a while and he fell asleep.  Unfortunately, I did not.  I was very concerned as to what was causing the discomfort and what I could do to help.  Because I was concerned that this could be something serious I decided to get up and do some research.

This post may contain affiliate links.  Although we may make a small commission it is at no cost to you.  See “Disclosure and Legal Things” section for complete details.

What is gurgling?

Gurgling, also known as Borborygmi or Borborygmus, occurs when the dog’s digestive system is processing food.  It occurs in animals just as it does in humans.  The food is chewed and swallowed and then begins its journey through the stomach and intestines.  It’s during this process that gurgling happens.  Quiet noises coming from the abdomen are normal.  Louder noises can be normal as well, or they can be a symptom of something more serious.

I am neither a veterinarian nor medical professional. The information in this article has been researched and sourced at the end of the post. All medical issues or questions regarding your pet’s health or symptoms should always be brought to the attention of your veterinarian for clarification, assessment, advice and treatment.

When is gurgling considered normal?

There are a number of circumstances which cause gurgling that are not a cause for serious concern.  These include:

  • Regular Digestion
  • Gas
  • Air passing through the system
  • Eating something that didn’t agree with your dog
  • General hunger

If your dog has recently eaten, she may have swallowed some air while eating.  This air may be moving around in the digestive tract and causing the sounds.  If she has lapped up water very quickly, there may be excessive air, which would create larger air pockets, thus causing louder noises as it moves its way through.  This generally does not cause pain or distress.

If she has eaten something that doesn’t agree with her, such as something she found on the street, she may be having a mild reaction to it. If her food has changed and she hasn’t adjusted yet, it can create some discomfort, just as it could in a human. Either of these situations can also cause gas. Usually, this will pass through and she will feel better soon.

It may simply be that your dog is hungry.  The body continues to process anything remaining in the digestive tract, but if there are little or no contents in the intestines, the system is only processing air and liquids. This is when the louder gurgling begins.  Once she eats, the body should adjust to the normal routine.

When you should be concerned:
A dog’s stomach gurgling is usually not serious, but if accompanied by other symptoms such as vomiting or diarrhea, it can be cause for concern.

If you see any of these symptoms in your dog, you should take her to a vet immediately.  There may be something more serious going on:

  • Reduced appetite
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Lethargic
  • Swollen stomach
  • Restlessness

Sometimes these symptoms can indicate a blockage or partial blockage in the intestines.  Your dog may have swallowed something around the house, outside in the yard or even on a walk with you.  If the object doesn’t move, food cannot pass through normally.  Because some or all of the food that your dog has eaten remains in the digestive system, she feels full and will not eat.  The small amount that does pass through will be mostly liquid, resulting in diarrhea. Depending on where the blockage is located, any food that has been consumed may be regurgitated (vomited).  A lack of food and nutrition will cause lethargy. Vomiting and diarrhea will rapidly cause dehydration and should be treated as quickly as possible.  Intestinal blockage is very serious and requires immediate medical attention.

If you notice that your dog’s tummy is swollen (blown up like a balloon) and that she seems to be having trouble settling down, this could indicate a condition called Bloat.  This is very serious and requires immediate medical attention.

Summary

Gurgling, on its own, can be caused by a number of circumstances, most of which are harmless and will go away within 24 to 48 hours.  If the gurgling is accompanied by any other symptoms, you should have your dog examined by a vet.  There may be a more serious underlying condition that needs to be addressed with medication or even surgery.  It is important not to wait if your dog is in any discomfort or distress as time may be of the essence.

Follow up on my dog’s condition:

Two days after the gurgling incident, Zorro woke several times in the night and eventually he vomited. A few hours later he had an episode of extreme diarrhea.  I made a vet appointment immediately.  He was put on a special diet for three days and has been given some medicine to coat his stomach in case of irritation.  The vet wants me to collect stool samples over the next few days to be analyzed. 

There has been no more vomiting.  We are keeping a close eye on him to be sure there are no further issues. So far Zorro is eating, sleeping and playing well and is almost back to his old self.

Sources:

https://www.petmd.com/dog/general-health/dog-stomach-noises-what-do-they-mean

https://www.dogster.com/dog-health-care/why-is-dogs-stomach-making-noises

https://www.preventivevet.com/dogs/help-my-dogs-stomach-is-bloated-understanding-canine-bloat-torsion-and-gdv

10 Weekend Things to do with your Dog

Dogs just love being near you, but offering them one on one time will always encourage positive behavior while strengthening the bond between you.

When you have some free time in the evening or on the weekend, you might want to spend part of it doing some things with your dog. There are many ways to spend time with your furry friend that will benefit you both mentally and physically. Dogs just love being near you, but offering them one on one time will always encourage positive behavior while strengthening the bond between you.

Here are some ways to fill a long day with your doggo that he will appreciate.

This post may contain affiliate links.  Although we may make a small commission it is at no cost to you.  See “Disclosure and Legal Things” section for complete details.

Go for long walks: 
Spending time outdoors is good for you and your dog. It provides the mental and physical exercise we all need!

Spending time outdoors is healthy for you and your dog.  Finding quiet trails, parks or a nice long beach to roam will provide the physical and mental exercise that your dog needs.  You can make it an outing for the whole family to enjoy.  Be sure to bring along water, treats and any safety gear necessary for the season and location.  A GPS tracker is always recommended.

Go for a drive:

If your dog likes the car, he will enjoy a short road trip or day trip. Pack a lunch for each of you, tuck him into his car seat and/or seat belt, and head off to somewhere away from your normal routine.  A walk somewhere out of the norm would only add to the fun.  He will enjoy exploring new territory.                                                                                      

Training the basics:

If you have a puppy you can spend time learning the basic skills – Sit, Stay, heel and come.  If you have an older dog you can practice them. A refresher course is often helpful. Even if it isn’t truly necessary, he will just love spending time with you and getting treats or praise for being a good boy!

Teach fun tricks:

If your doggo is ready to move on from the basics, teaching him cool tricks will be fun for both of you.  Teaching your dog to play fetch is always a fun game that your will enjoy forever.  Other options are hide and seek, roll over or even to clean up his own toys.  That last one will benefit you for years to come!

Spa Day:

A bubble bath can be as enjoyable for many doggos as it would be for you. Fill the tub with some dog safe shampoo and let the bubbles fly. Be sure to rinse well and dry him off to avoid skin irritation.

For those that don’t enjoy a bath, you can spend time brushing him and removing all excess fur. This can help to clean your dog, as well as remove knots that may be causing discomfort or excess fur that could be making it too warm for the season. Using a good brush or comb will aid in the removal of the undercoat and reduce the amount of shedding in your house as well.

Doggy massage:

Turn on some spa music and ask your pup to lie down.  Start at his head and work your way down to his tail, gently massaging his neck, back, underarms, belly and legs.  If your dog has a sensitive area that he doesn’t like to have touched, skip it and move on.  The one on one interaction provides some special bonding time for you both.

Mani/pedi:

Many dogs do not like this one, but it still has to be done.  You can make it more pleasant for both of you by being patient.  When your dog is calm, take a moment to clip his nails so that he is comfortable walking.  If his nails are too long, it becomes painful for your doggo as his toes do not sit in the correct position on the floor when he stands.  You can use clippers if you are comfortable with them or you can try a nail grinder.  I have never used one of these, but I have heard that they can be less stressful for both you and your pup.  There is no fear of over clipping, causing your dog’s nails to bleed.  The more pleasant you can make this process, the more comfortable your doggo will be having his manicure in the future.

Laser Pointer: 

Until I got my current pup, I thought that a laser pointer was a cat toy.  Zorro has proven that dogs have just as much fun chasing that little red dot!  He can do this for quite a long time and he gets very tired by the time we stop.  This is a form of mental stimulation as well because he has to follow the dot. 

Flashlight: 

My German Shepherd, Princess (AKA “Doggo”), loved to chase the beam from a flashlight.  Similar to the laser, she would hunt it down and run after it.  It would keep her busy inside or out (at night) and would give her a good mental and physical workout. I always gave her a special treat at the end of the last chase to ensure that all of her work was worth it!

Snuggle Time:

At the end of a long day, or on a quiet, lazy afternoon, your friend will benefit from a nice cuddle session.  Watch TV, have a nap or read a book with your pup snuggled up close to you.  We are so busy running around most of the time, that we rarely have the time to just sit and be together.  It’s a perfect bonding experience that your dog will love.

Whatever way you choose to spend time with your pup, it will allow you both to de-stress and just enjoy each other’s company.  Whether you take a few minutes or half a day, your doggo will be grateful that you did.