Signs and Symptoms of a Dog Who Has Heatstroke 

When dogs become overheated it can result in a serious medical problem known as heatstroke.  This condition can come on quickly and result in severe illness or even death. 

When dogs become overheated it can result in a serious medical problem known as heatstroke.  This condition can come on quickly and result in severe illness or even death.  Knowing how to  prevent heatstroke and what the signs and symptoms of a dog who has heatstroke are when you are out with your doggo, can make a walk, a play day, or a day at the beach a great experience for everyone.

German Shepard Laying in the grass in the sun
Dogs playing on the sun should be monitored for signs and symptoms of Heatstroke.
Photo by M. Shea

I am neither a veterinarian nor a medical professional. The information in this article has been researched and sourced at the end of the post. All medical issues or questions regarding your pet’s health or symptoms should always be brought to the attention of your veterinarian for clarification, assessment, advice and treatment.

Early Warning Signs That Your Dog is Overheating

When a dog is out on a hot day or even in a hot indoor environment, he will begin to show signs of attempting to cool down.  These signs can also appear after exercising or after an intense play session.  The most recognizable visible symptoms are panting and getting a drink, but there are times when the heat is more intense that we expect and your dog may develop more serious symptoms. If you see any of the following symptoms, you must immediately take precautions to cool your dog down: 

  • Panting excessively
  • Drooling/frothing
  • Laying on or searching for cool areas
  • Rapid Heartbeat

Extreme Symptoms of A dog Who is Too Hot

Dogs can overheat in a matter of only a few minutes.  They may seem like they are doing fine while walking or playing, bit suddenly your dog appears to be unwell. If your dog is experiencing any of the visible signs listed below, take her to the vet immediately. 

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Lethargic
  • Stumbling/difficulty walking
  • Seizures
  • Losing consciousness
  • Death 

A dog who is experiencing VISIBLE signs of heatstroke may also have medical issues that are NOT VISIBLE, so a trip to the vet is highly recommended to be sure there are no internal medical repercussions of the overheating or heatstroke.

Video by: NBC Channel 12 News (YouTube)

What Happens if My Dog Gets Heatstroke?

This post may contain affiliate links.  Although we may make a small commission it is at no cost to you.  See “Disclosure and Legal Things” section for complete details.

Dogs who develop heatstroke can develop further, more serious, medical issues.  In a severe case it could affect your dog’s kidneys (including kidney failure), brain, heart, and cause significant respiratory issues.  

How Does a Dog’s Body Cool Down Naturally?

Dogs do not have many sweat glands. Their bodies rely on only a few methods to bring their temperature down.  

  • Panting – when dogs pant the water in their mouth evaporates and cools them down.
  • Nose – Dogs sweat through their noses allowing them to release heat 
  • Feet – Dogs have sweat glands in their paws that help them to reduce their body temperature
  • Ears – A dog’s ears contain blood vessels that are close to the surface.  When the blood vessels dilate, it helps to cool the blood running through them.

It’s important to note that these natural methods are not very effective for cooling down quickly. They do not have the capacity to cool down a dog who is overheating and requires immediate temperature reduction.

What to Do If You Think Your Dog is Getting Too Hot:

If you see signs that your dog is getting too hot, there are ways to help her cool down before things get dangerous.  

  • You should bring the dog in or to a cooler place if you see signs of her becoming too hot.  Just a change to a shaded area or into a cool building will provide your dog with relief.
  • Provide plenty of drinking water. Cool water can help your dog to cool down from the inside. Do not force your dog to drink.  She will take water when she is ready.
  • Wet your dog with cool water (not too cold as this could be a shocking contrast)

Take your dog to the vet immediately to be sure there are no hidden side effects of overheating.

Prevention of Heat Stroke in Dogs

It is up to us, as responsible and caring pet owners, to provide a safe environment for our pups.  One of the most important safety concerns for dogs is to make sure they are protected from the elements. It is common for people to dress their dogs warmly in winter or to put booties on to protect their paws from the ice and snow, it is less obvious for us to see how our dogs need to be protected from the elements in the summer. While it is becoming more common for dog parents to check the temperature of the pavement before letting their dogs walk on it, it is also crucial that we take measures to protect our dogs from heatstroke.

Here are some important ways to prevent Heatstroke:

  • DON’T LEAVE YOUR DOG IN A CAR – EVER;  NOT EVEN FOR A FEW MINUTES
  • Keep dog groomed and well brushed to reduce heavy fur
  • Apply Sunscreen specially made for dogs
  • Keep away from concrete on hot days
  • Walk in shaded or cooler arrears
  • Walk early in the morning or later in the evening when it’s cooler
  • Provide shade at the beach (umbrellas, demi tents)
  • Offer a cooling pad for your dog to rest on
  • Make sure your home is at a safe temperature while you are away.
  • Keep dog crates away from windows in any season. The sun coming in through the window may cause a very hot environment that your dog cannot escape from when crated.

NOTE:  There are some dog breeds who are more susceptible to breathing issues when in the heat.  Knowing your dog’s natural limits should be taken into account before spending time outside in warm weather.

Summary

Heatstroke is a serious and dangerous condition.  Taking steps to prevent heat from harming your dog is crucial in all seasons and climates.  There are very simple methods of ensuring your dog’s safety while walking, playing, traveling or on an outing.  According to The Kennel Club, 1 in 7 dogs dogs who are treated for Heatstroke do not survive.  This statistic demonstrates the severity of the condition and the importance of prevention.

Suggested Reading:

Sources:

https://www.memphisveterinaryspecialists.com/site/blog-cordova/2019/11/25/dog-heat-stroke-symptoms-treatment-prevention

https://vcacanada.com/know-your-pet/heat-stroke-in-dogs

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What Are the Causes and Symptoms of Dandruff in Dogs

You may see flakes on your dog’s bed, blankets, coat, car seat, harness or on your furniture.  If you discover that your doggo has dandruff, it is important to narrow down the cause so that it can be treated appropriately. 

I was giving my dog Zorro a massage the other day.  His black coat is shiny and smooth, but I noticed that he had many little white flakes all over his back.  At first, I thought it was dust and wondered where he would have been to get covered in dust.  I looked a little closer, brushed back his fur a little and realized that it was coming from his skin.  My dog has dandruff.  I hadn’t seen this before so I set out to learn the causes and symptoms of dandruff in dogs.

Shiny black lab face staring off to the left indicating that the dogs fur is not dull no skin issues are visible.
If your dog’s shiny coat becomes dull, it could be caused by hyperthyroidism resulting in skin irritation. Photo by: M. Shea

This post may contain affiliate links.  Although we may make a small commission it is at no cost to you.  See “Disclosure and Legal Things” section for complete details.

Is dandruff a common occurrence for dogs? 

Dandruff is common in dogs.  You may notice it on your dog’s fur, although it is more difficult to see on a lighter colored dog.  You may also see it on your dog’s bed, blankets, coat, car seat, harness or on your furniture.  If you discover that your doggo has dandruff, it is important to narrow down the cause so that it can be treated appropriately. 

What are the potential causes of dandruff in dogs?

I am neither a veterinarian nor a medical professional. The information in this article has been researched and sourced at the end of the post. All medical issues or questions regarding your pet’s health or symptoms should always be brought to the attention of your veterinarian for clarification, assessment, advice and treatment.

  1. Dry Climate
  2. Allergic Reaction
  3. Diet is missing something – Often Omega 3 or Omega 6
  4. Grooming – Too much or too little
  5. Stress
  6. Infection – Fungal and Bacterial
  7. Hypothyroidism
  8. Mange
  9. Seborrhea
  10. Walking Dandruff – Note:  This is very contagious.
Walking Dandruff in Dogs Video by Wag

Because of the wide range of causes, it is important to narrow down the environment(s) that your dog has been in recently. Learning the source will help to find the appropriate treatment.  If your dog is showing any other symptoms, seek the advice of your veterinarian immediately as there may be a more serious underlying cause.  Early detection and diagnosis of any pet ailment or concern is key to having the best chance of recovery without permanent damage.

If the only symptom is dandruff here are some questions to help narrow down the possible sources of your pup’s dandruff:

Has the weather become dryer or has the heat in your home been turned on recently?

Weather changes to dryer conditions or the furnace in your home running can cause your dog’s skin to dry out.  This would cause flaking and itching. Brushing your dog regularly and increasing the humidity in your home by using a humidifier can help to alleviate the symptoms.

Has your dog eaten anything new?

Food allergies are common and can result in itchy, dry, flaky skin. If you have changed your dog’s food, treats or if he has managed to get into the garbage, he could be having an allergic reaction to something he has consumed. Unknown foods can be dangerous for your dog in many ways, so it’s best to be sure nothing dangerous has been consumed. If your dog has always had the same food, he may have developed an allergy. Consult your vet about a change in food that could help ease the symptoms.

Have you changed anything in your home or yard (cleaning products, plants, garden)?

Has your dog been laying on your freshly cleaned carpet or furniture?  Has he been rolling on the lawn after a treatment?  If so, his skin may be irritated.  Even the use of new laundry detergent or fabric softeners on bedding, dog coats or your own clothes can be a skin irritant.

Is your dog’s diet rich in Omega 3 and Omega 6?

These two fatty acids benefit the dog’s skin.  If your dog food is lacking in either or both of these nutrients, he may develop skin irritation resulting in dandruff.  The best source of Omegas is directly from foods, but your vet may recommend a supplement to add to your dog’s daily routine.

How often do your bathe and groom your dog?

If you bathe your dog frequently, you may be accidentally drying his skin.  Shampoos, soaps and hair dryers can take their toll on a dog’s skin leaving it dry and flaky.

Has something changed in his daily routine or in the home?

If your dog is upset, if his little world has been disrupted in any way, he may be stressed.  Something as simple as moving his bed, or location of his dish can cause anxiety for some doggos. If his human’s work routine has changed, a new family member has arrived (human or fur), or if someone in the house is stressed or sick, your dog may be feeling anxious. Stress is a common cause of dandruff.

Does your dog have visible skin irritation?

If your dog has fleas, a recent cut or if he has food allergies, the skin can develop a fungal or a bacterial infection.  Consult a vet if your dog’s skin appears red, crusty, has bald or thinning patches of fur, or of he has an unusual odor.  All are signs of infection. These skin infections can cause dandruff. 

Has your dog’s once smooth, shiny coat become dull and coarse?

These are a couple of the symptoms of hypothyroidism.  Because of this underlying condition, your dog may be itchy and develop sores. He may begin shedding more than usual.  There are many other symptoms of hypothyroidism, including ear infections, fatigue and aversion to cold.  It is important to have this condition diagnosed and treated by a veterinarian immediately.

Does your dog have mites?

Mites can cause many types of skin irritations including itching, hair loss and dandruff.  If you suspect mites, have your dog tested and treated.  Mites can be transmitted to humans and other pets. Some species of mites cause mange, another skin disease found in animals and birds.

Is your dog’s flaky skin is located solely on the face, and torso?

These areas contain sebaceous glands.  If the dandruff that your dog is experiencing is predominantly in these areas, he may have a skin condition cause Seborrhea. The skin will appear red and flaky.  Your dog will also be itchy.  This is another condition where your dog might develop an odor.  Once diagnosed, a veterinarian will be able to recommend shampoos or medication to clear it up.

Summary

There are a number of causes of skin irritation and dandruff in dogs. If you see anything that looks unusual or your dog is scratching excessively, contact your vet as soon as possible. While most dandruff issues are minor, they can cause a lot of discomfort for your doggo. The sooner he is treated, the sooner he feels better.

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7 Things You Need to Know About Ear Infections in Dogs

Dogs’ ears are one of the most sensitive parts of their bodies. They are also vulnerable to a variety of issues, most commonly, ear infections. All dogs’ ears have an internal shape that allows water, wax, dust, dirt, and any other object that will fit in there to collect and fester. This makes them vulnerable to ear infections.

Dogs’ ears are one of the most sensitive parts of their bodies. They are also vulnerable to a variety of issues, most commonly, ear infections. All dogs’ ears have an internal shape that allows water, wax, dust, dirt, and any other object that will fit in there to collect and fester. This makes them vulnerable to ear infections. Some dogs are more susceptible than others because of the type of ears they have. No matter the breed, size, or age of your dog, being familiar with the signs and symptoms of an ear infection is a good idea. An ear infection that goes unrecognized and therefore untreated, can lead to chronic ear infections and ultimately, permanent hearing issues. Here are 7 things you need to know about ear infections in dogs:

What are the Causes of Ear Infections in Dogs?

I am neither a veterinarian nor a medical professional. The information in this article has been researched and sourced at the end of the post. All medical issues or questions regarding your pet’s health or symptoms should always be brought to the attention of your veterinarian for clarification, assessment, advice and treatment.

There are several ways that a dog’s inner ears can become irritated which eventually leads to a painful infection. One of the most common causes is dampness that is not properly dried. When the water remains in the ear, the dampness causes bacteria to grow, and infection sets in.

This initial infection occurs in the outer ear (Otitis Externa) but according to pets.webmd.com, is, 

“usually a secondary development in up to 50% of chronic otitis externa cases.”

While water seems to be the leading source of ear infections, your dog may have many other irritants causing the infection to set in. Other causes to be aware of are:

Ear Mites – small parasites that are found on the surface of the skin in the dog’s ears. Ear mites are contagious to other pets through direct contact.

Yeast – mostly caused by dampness or humidity. Other causes are related to the consumption of grains, sugar and taking antibiotics.

Dust, dirt, and debris – when small particles become trapped in the dog’s ear, it can cause irritation that leads to infection.

Polyps – bumps that grow in the ear. They can be brought on by allergies, or excessive amounts of earwax that causes the ear to become irritated and inflamed. Polyps develop causing a blockage or partial blockage in the ear, making it easy for fluids to become trapped, leading to bacterial or yeast growth.

Ultimately. All dogs are susceptible to contracting ear infections given their surroundings, but they are especially problematic for dogs with floppy ears, including:

Golden Retriever face with ears hanging.
Dogs with floppy ears are prone to ear infections. Photo by: M. Shea

Basset Hounds

Beagles

Cocker Spaniels

Dachshunds

Saint Bernards

Poodles

Afghans

Golden Retrievers

This is because the ear covers the ear canal keeping the area moist, resulting in bacterial or yeast growth.  

Is Grooming Associated With Ear Infections?

This post may contain affiliate links.  Although we may make a small commission it is at no cost to you.  See “Disclosure and Legal Things” section for complete details.

There is definitely a connection between grooming your dog and ear infections. Because your dog is being bathed while at a groomer, the likelihood of water becoming trapped in the ear is a distinct possibility. A professional groomer who is properly trained to bathe a dog will watch for this and will address it.  

Cleaning your dog’s ears should be part of the grooming process. While the groomer is removing the excess fur in the ear canal, they will be careful to avoid any debris falling into the ear canal and will gently wipe any wax build-up from the area with a cloth.  

Both of these situations, if not done properly, could result in water or fur entering the canal and a build-up of wax that could block the debris and moisture in.

This is why you should be sure to use a well-trained groomer to care for your dog. It may seem like a simple task, but bathing and grooming your dog requires a skilled professional to avoid issues related to the grooming process.

Can Swimming Cause Ear Infections In Dogs?

Just as with bathing, swimming can cause water to enter the ear canal and become trapped. This is known as Swimmer’s Ear. When your dog is swimming he may put his head underwater. Even if your dog’s head appears to stay above the water line, waves splash up around your dog’s head and can enter the ear canal. If you are spending the day at the beach, water is not the only concern. Sand and debris can easily enter then ear canal and become stuck.

Dogs who are prone to ear infections will be more susceptible to Swimmer’s Ear, but it can occur in any dog after a day at the beach. Cleaning your dog’s ears with a Veterinary approved ear cleaner will help to clear out dirt, sand, or debris and will help to evaporate any remaining fluids left in the ear canal.

The following video demonstrates how to use ear cleaning solutions and supplies safely and effectively when caring for your dog’s ears:

Video from: Forever Home Initiative

What Are The Symptoms of Your Dog’s Ears Being Infected?

When a dog’s ears become irritated, they will begin showing signs of discomfort. Your dog may begin to shake her head repeatedly or scratch at the affected ear. Some dogs may rub their heads along the ground in an effort to ease the itching and burning.  

As the infection progresses, the dog may wince or pull away from you when you touch the ear area. If you look into the ear, you may see red skin inside the ear flap, dark-colored fluid coming from inside the ear canal and there may be a foul odor emanating from the ear.

Inside of a Golder Retriever's ear showing redness and irritation
Ears may become red and irritated.
Photo by: M. Shea

If you see any of these indicators, you should visit the vet immediately to have your dog checked out by a professional.

How Does the Vet Test Your Dog For a Potential Ear Infection?

The vet will inspect the dog’s outer ear, looking for visible signs of infection. Then she will use a tool called an otoscope to look into the ear canal to see if there are any obstructions and to ensure that the eardrum has not been damaged or perforated.  

A sample of the discharge from the ear may be collected to learn the cause of the infection.

What Kind of Medication Will Your Vet Prescribe?

Depending on the type of infection, the vet may prescribe medicated drops, topical cream, or a prescription ear cleanser to treat the infection. Something that has been lodged in the ear canal and is causing the infection, may have to be removed surgically.

What Happens if Your Dog’s Ear Infection Goes Untreated?

Aside from the severe pain your dog will experience, untreated ear infections will cause permanent damage to your dog’s hearing. In severe cases, the damage may result in deafness. Your dog could also experience a permanent loss of balance as ear functionality is directly related to equilibrium. 

Many DIY, home remedies, and natural methods suggested for use in treating ear infections, can cause more harm than good. Some cause skin irritations, others might exacerbate the problem by leaving dampness in the ear canal.

A veterinarian or a professional Naturopath, if you prefer, will provide your dog with the best treatment methods.

Summary

A dog’s ears are complex and sensitive. Caring for your dog’s ears is a vital part of your dog’s wellness routine. It is important to be aware of symptoms of ear pain and discomfort. Seek treatment immediately if your dog appears to be uncomfortable, especially after swimming or bathing. Using veterinary recommended ear cleaners can help to prevent buildup in the ear canal that can cause blockage or bacteria to grow.

Protecting and caring for your dog’s ears will prevent permanent damage that will affect their lifestyle. 

Related post:

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What is Dog Dementia? How Do I Know if My Dog Has It?

What is Dementia?

The CDC defines dementia as, “The general term for the impaired ability to remember, think, or make decisions that interferes with doing everyday activities”

This means that doing day to day things becomes difficult.  You may forget how to tie your shoes or use the remote to change the TV channel. For dogs, this could mean forgetting where the food dish is, or how to play fetch. They may not understand commands that they have been responding to since puppyhood or may act strangely.

Many are surprised that dogs are susceptible to developing dementia or Canine Cognitive Dysfunction, but they do and it’s important to know how to identify it so that you can help your dog to feel safe and comfortable.

I am neither a veterinarian nor a medical professional. The information in this article has been researched and sourced at the end of the post if required. All safety and medical issues or questions regarding your pet’s health or symptoms should always be brought to the attention of your veterinarian for clarification, assessment, advice, and treatment.

As with humans, the cause of dementia in dogs is not clear.  Some think that it is caused by plaque build-up in the brain. Others feel it’s a result of a reduced amount of dopamine. Both cause communication between nerves in the brain to be blocked.

How common is it for Dogs to Develop Dementia?

Diagnosing dementia in dogs has become more common in recent years.  As we learn to properly care for our dogs, they are living longer and longer.  Signs of dementia are found in about half of dogs who are more than eleven years old, but symptoms may be discovered in dogs as young as nine.  Almost twenty percent more are diagnosed by the time they are fifteen.

This post may contain affiliate links.  Although we may make a small commission it is at no cost to you.  See “Disclosure and Legal Things” section for complete details.

What are the Signs and Symptoms of Dog Dementia? 

You may not recognize the signs right away as they can be subtle and are often brushed off as other things.

Your dog may occasionally not react when you call his name.  He may not perform a trick or a command. You may notice that he has developed sleep issues or sometimes he may not want to eat. He may not want to play as often as he did before or may become a Velcro dog. Sometimes, in later stages you may find that he seems lost in his own house or yard, maybe unable to find his favorite bed. He may begin jumping up on furniture he was never allowed to be on or having accidents in the house.  You may find that he seems to be agitated or you may find him crying for what seems to be no reason at all.

German Shepherd laying down with her head on her paws looking sad.
Photo by: M. Shea

These symptoms don’t just happen overnight. One unusual situation here and one weird event there. They don’t seem to be connected. Sadly, in many cases we justify all of these symptoms as the actions of a dog being silly, having eaten something that disagrees with him, being rebellious, or just being a cranky old guy.

As the disease progresses and the symptoms become more frequent, it becomes apparent that there is something more going on and the dog is taken to the vet for an examination.

How is Canine Cognitive Dysfunction Diagnosed?

Because there are no specific tests to diagnose dementia, it is basically done by process of elimination.  The vet will run a battery of tests to see if your dog’s urine, blood, or brain show any symptoms of another illness. A dog who is unable to see or hear could seem to be lost or disobedient, therefore a hearing and vision test will be done.  Accidents in the house could be brought on by a urinary tract infection or kidney issues.  Bowel function will be analyzed for the same reason.  

If all of the test results for physical problems are normal, your vet will ask questions pertaining to your dog’s history and current behavior.  The results of the physical and questionnaire will help the vet conclude that your dog has dementia.

Are There Any Medications to Cure or Manage Dog Dementia?

While there is no cure for dementia, there are medications available to manage some of the symptoms.  

Selegiline is a drug used in an attempt to help with cognitive function.  According to VCA animal hospital, “its effectiveness has not been proven.”

To assist with a dog who is agitated, crying, or showing any other symptoms of stress or anxiety, the vet might prescribe medication to help calm your dog.

Can Games or Activities Prevent Dementia in Dogs?

Golden Retriever staring off into the distance while standing in the park.
Photo by: M. Shea

Keeping your dog busy and active keeps his brain sharp.  Similar to exercising his body, making sure your dog’s brain is well exercised will help to maintain its function.  

Here is an article that will provide you with ideas for stimulating your dog’s brain in order to help prevent or slow down the progression of Canine Cognitive Dysfunction.

Exercising Your Dog’s Brain

How Can You Help Your Dog to Live Comfortably if He Has Dementia?

Some of the other things you can do to help your dog live more comfortably is to be sure to keep things in his life very familiar.  This includes sticking to a strict routine, so he knows what to expect.  What seems like a minor deviation from your daily routine can wreak havoc on a dog with cognitive issues. 

Your dog’s physical surroundings are a source of familiarity, and therefor provides comfort for a dog who can easily become disoriented.  It is important not to move or change furniture.  Changing houses or traveling with your pup could cause increased stress and emotional strain leading to more confusion and disorientation.  The more things stay the same, the more content and self sufficient your dog will be.

Most of all, be patient.  Living with a dog with dementia is frustrating for everyone, but mostly for your doggo. If you become stressed or impatient, he will sense it. He is the same loyal friend you have loved since puppyhood, and he needs you now more than ever.

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Is a Chiropractor Good for Dogs?

When conventional methods such as weight reduction or pain medication have failed to resolve your dog’s symptoms, the veterinarian may recommend a dog chiropractor to help ease the discomfort.

Referring dogs to be treated by a dog chiropractor is becoming more widely accepted by veterinarians across the globe, but is a chiropractor good for dogs? The realization that alternative medicine, in conjunction with conventional medicine, can offer significant benefits to the patient is becoming more commonplace. Dogs, like humans, respond well to chiropractic adjustments and treatments to help reduce pain as well as prevent the progression of many musculoskeletal conditions. 

Brown and white dog wearing an Elizabethan collar,
It’s becoming more common for vets to refer dogs to a dog chiropractor to help ease discomfort.
( Photo: Canva Pictures)

     

Symptoms Indicating That Your Dog May Need a Chiropractor

One of the earliest signs that your dog is experiencing discomfort is when they begin to have mobility issues. Daily walks may become very slow, or a limp may develop. Games like fetch or frisbee, that your dog once loved may not be of any interest to them, and the simple tasks of getting up from the floor could seem like a slow and difficult process.

Some indicators may be a bit more subtle. When laying down you may notice that your dog is licking or biting at their paws. Some struggle to sleep. They become restless and change positions frequently. This is because the pain they are experiencing in one position can be temporarily relieved when they shift the pressure from one side to the other. When they awaken, you may find that they stretch more than they did before as the joints are becoming stiff. 

Medical Reasons Why Your Dog Might Need to See a Chiropractor

When conventional methods such as weight reduction or pain medication have failed to resolve any of the above issues, your veterinarian may recommend a dog chiropractor to help ease the discomfort. Some of the most common medical conditions that result in a referral to the dog chiropractor are:  

  • Degenerative Disc Disease 
  • Hip Dysplasia 
  • Osteoarthritis 
  • Surgical Recovery 
  • Senior dogs with mobility issues
  • Incontinence 
  • Pregnancy and delivery
Black and brown Dachshund standing in the grass on a leash.
Long-bodied, short-legged breeds are prone to hip dysplasia due to the continuous pressure on their hips. (Photo: Canva Pictures)

Short-legged dog breeds including Dachshunds, Corgis, French and English Bulldogs as well as Basset Hounds often require chiropractic care for hip dysplasia and/or spinal issues. This is generally caused by their physical makeup causing pressure on the back and hip joint. Larger breeds, including Great Danes, Golden Retrievers, German Shepherds, Mastiffs, and Saint Bernards also tend to suffer from hip dysplasia.  With the larger breeds, their weight adds pressure to the hip joint.  The physical impact of running and jumping can also cause pressure in the hips, resulting in dysplasia.

Black Great Dane staring off in the distance.
Great Danes are prone to hip dysplasia due to their size and active nature.   (Photo: M. Shea)

Are Veterinarians Qualified to be Dog Chiropractors?

Dog chiropractors are human chiropractors with additional written and practical education credentials that allow them to work on animals. Not all veterinarians are qualified to perform chiropractic treatments. If your vet feels that chiropractic care would be beneficial to your pet’s well-being, they will provide a referral to a qualified professional. If you are looking for a chiropractor on your own, be sure to check the International Veterinary Chiropractic Association or the American Veterinary Chiropractic Association for a list of reputable animal chiropractors in your area.

What Does the Dog Chiropractor Do at Each Visit?

Your first visit will involve a physical assessment. The chiropractor will look at the source of the dog’s discomfort and try to determine the severity of the condition. If your dog was referred by a vet, the assessment will include a review of the medical history provided by the referring vet. This will help to evaluate the dog’s current state. Depending on what they discover in the exam and what conditions are suspected, they may order x-rays or an MRI to confirm their suspicions. Many times, the dog will only need one alignment to reset the affected area, and it will be done during the initial visit. In some situations, it can take a series of adjustments or treatments to completely correct the source of the pain.

Mature English Bull Dog playing with yellow ball
Chiropractic care can improve mobility in older dogs.       (Photo: Canva Pictures)

Benefits of Taking Your Dog to a Dog Chiropractor:

When your dog receives chiropractic care, many common pain-related issues can be overcome. Mobility Issues are reduced or removed, and the dog will often be able to return to their normal activities. Chronic pain caused by hip dysplasia, disc disease, or osteoarthritis can be managed or eliminated, and it improves the quality of life as joints become weak for your aging pet.

There are practices to facilitate the recovery process after certain surgeries, resulting in reduced pain and a speedier return to “normal”. There are times when the sooner your dog is able to move around, the faster the body will respond and heal. Chiropractic care can even ease the effects of pregnancy. Adjustments and/or spinal manipulation can help with pain and discomfort caused by the increasing pressure and weight on the spine as the puppies grow. 

There are specific procedures that can reduce the likelihood of delivery issues. By helping to prevent stretching of the ligaments that surround the uterus, the uterus maintains its proper shape. Having these pain points addressed and monitored will make the delivery smoother. This will prevent excessive stress on the mother and the pups.

Golden Retriever Standing in yellow fall leaves.
Breeds that are predisposed or prone to hip dysplasia, spinal issues, or disc degeneration
might benefit from having pet insurance coverage. (Photo: M. Shea)

What is the Cost of Chiropractic Care for Dogs?

Dog chiropractors in the USA generally charge between $50.00 and $250.00 per visit. Often, the range in pricing is based on location. Chiropractors in larger cities likely charge more than a rural area.

The initial exam and assessment appointments are usually more expensive than the treatments. If your dog needs ongoing treatments, special package pricing is often offered to help reduce the payments.

There are additional costs associated with veterinary chiropractic service. These include X-rays, MRIs, and blood work. While most of these are associated with the diagnosis they may have to be redone. Once the initial series of treatments is complete, tests may have to be redone to assess the progress and the potential need for more adjustments.

Are Chiropractic Services Covered By Pet Insurance Providers?

Many pet insurance companies offer chiropractic coverage as additional coverage at an additional cost. As with every other circumstance, insurance companies will not cover a pre-existing condition. You have to select the add-on when purchasing your plan. If you have a dog whose breed is prone to any of the common conditions that can be managed by a chiropractor, it might be wise to opt for the upgraded insurance package.

Is a Chiropractor a Good Option for Dogs?

Taking your dog to a chiropractor may seem a bit unusual, but it is as effective for pets as it is for humans. The practice of healing animals using chiropractic techniques dates back to the early 1900s. Although the combined efforts of veterinary and chiropractic care may seem like a new concept, it has been around for a while. The American Veterinary Chiropractic Association was formed in 1989. Its purpose was to offer multiple options to treat your dog’s musculoskeletal and chronic pain issues.

Have you had an experience taking your dog to the chiropractor? Please tell us about it in the comment section.

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Why Dogs Scoot

While scooting is a very common occurrence for dogs, it is a definite sign of irritation. The source of the discomfort may be something mild that will resolve itself, something a pet owner can assist with, or it may be something that requires urgent veterinary attention.

When a dog places his bum on the floor and drags himself across the room, it’s called scooting. This act usually means that your dog is uncomfortable and is trying to correct a problem in the anal area.  There are a number of reasons why dogs scoot.  Some may require your assistance and others may be an indication of a more serious medical problem that will warrant a trip to the vet.

I am neither a veterinarian nor a medical professional. The information in this article has been researched and sourced at the end of the post if required. All safety and medical issues or questions regarding your pet’s health or symptoms should always be brought to the attention of your veterinarian for clarification, assessment, advice and treatment.

If the scooting only happens once, your dog has probably resolved the issue on his own. Should your dog seem to be uncomfortable,  if the behavior continues or if it is accompanied by your dog licking the area, you should investigate the cause of the problem. If you don’t see anything obvious, you should ask a veterinary professional to investigate.

Scooting is generally a dog’s attempt to remove unwanted foreign objects on the fur or to relieve itching or pain.  If your dog is scooting, check for one of the following issues:

NOTE:  If you don’t see any of these on your own and your dog continues to scoot, make and appointment with your vet as soon as possible. The problem may be internal.

Dirt 

Your dog may have poop or other dirt stuck on his fur. Sometimes, if your dog’s poop is a little more runny than usual, traces may be left on the fur around the anus.  When it dries it becomes sticky and difficult to remove.  Your dog may not be able to clean it with normal grooming and will try dragging along the floor or carpet to remove the unwanted mess.

This post may contain affiliate links.  Although we may make a small commission it is at no cost to you.  See “Disclosure and Legal Things” section for complete details.

To remove the dirty you can try washing the area and gently brushing the dirt from the fur. If it is too difficult to remove, a professional groomer will be able to bathe your dog and remove any foreign matter safely.

Matted Fur

When a dog’s fur becomes matted, it pulls and tears at the dogs skin. If your dog’s fur has grown and become matted he may be trying to relieve the discomfort by dragging himself across the floor.  Matting can also be caused by dirt or wet fur that is left to dry on it’s own.  Mild matting can be gently brushed out using a comb or dematting tool.

If the matting is severe a visit to a reputable groomer or the vet will be necessary.

Fur That Has Been Cut Too Short 

If your dog has recently been groomed or matting has had to be cut out,  The fur that is growing back can cause the area to be irritated and itchy.  Just as it does with humans, shaving too close can cause razor burn or cuts. If the grooming was too short, your dog may experience some discomfort. Scooting will act as a form of scratching.

Caution:  If your dog has any cuts or wounds, see a vet immediately as they can become infected.

Injury: 

Golden retreiver sniffing bushes where scrapes and cuts could happen.
Dogs can get scratches or scrapes while playing in bushes or trees, or just from sitting on the ground outside.

Apart from grooming, your pooch can become injured in other ways.  When they sit on the ground or play in the bushes while on a walk, it is possible to get splinters, cuts, or scrapes.  These can become inflamed and infected.  This may cause your dog to attempt to relieve the soreness by rubbing it against the cool or abrasive surface of the floor.

String/Hair/Ribbon Still Attached Inside

How often do you see your dog pooping and it looks like it is attached by a hair?  If the poop is still attached, your dog will try scooting along trying to pull the rest of it out. This can happen with hair, string, ribbon, wool or any other linear item your dog may have swallowed.  This is very uncomfortable for your pup.

If this happens, DO NOT try to pull the piece out.  The string – like item may be stuck somewhere inside your dog’s intestinal tract.  If you pull, you can cause serious internal damage to your dog.  Take your dog to the vet. A professional will do an exam and will be able to tell where the string is located.  Your vet will offer options as to how to safely remove the string.

Worms

Dogs are prone to getting a variety of worms.  These can cause anal itching.  Your dog will attempt to stop the itch by rubbing it on the floor.  

Although worms are fairly common, that doesn’t mean they are harmless. It is important that your dog’s worms are identified and treated by a vet as soon as possible to avoid further complications, illness or, in some cases, death.

Fleas, Ticks, Insect Bites or Bee Stings

If your dog has fleas, they may cause itchiness in any area, including the rear end. The itching can be extremely bothersome and your dog may be attempting to relieve the itch by rubbing it on the floor or carpet.

A bee sting, mosquito, or other insect bites can make for a painful or itchy situation for your dog. When your dog feels the effects of the insect’s sting or bite, she will attempt to ease the unwanted sensation by licking at the area or rubbing herself along the floor. If the bite is in the anal area, scooting is the best way to address the discomfort in that location.

Blocked Anal Glands

There are two sacs around the anus that contain fluid that is released when your dog has a bowel movement.  Occasionally, these sacs, known as Anal Glands, will become blocked and will not release the fluids, causing a pressure build up. This creates a lot of discomfort and your dog will try to release the pressure by scooting.  

Blocked Anal Glands should never be left untreated.  A vet will release the fluid and confirm that there has been no further damage.  A second visit, 4-6 weeks later, may be required to be sure that the anal glands are functioning properly.

For further information about blocked anal glands see:  Anal Gland Expression For Dogs

Summary

While scooting is a very common occurrence for dogs, it is a definite sign of irritation.  The source of the discomfort may be something mild that will resolve itself, something a pet owner can assist with, or it may be something that requires urgent veterinary attention. Because there are a number of reasons why dogs scoot, you should be sure to investigate the cause as soon as it happens so that you can help your doggo in safe and timely manner.

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Gastrointestinal Blockage in Dogs: Signs, Symptoms and Prevention

If the item that the dog consumes is unable to pass through the dog’s digestive tract, it can cause an obstruction. This can have severe consequences, including emergency surgery and death.

Puppies like to eat everything.  They explore and discover by smelling and “tasting” almost everything they come across.  This is not limited to edible items and can be dangerous.  Unfortunately, there are many adult dogs that continue this trait, even if it’s only on occasion.  If the item that the dog consumes is unable to pass through the dog’s digestive tract, it can cause an obstruction.  This can have severe consequences, including emergency surgery and death.  It’s important to monitor your dog while he plays and to remove all smaller items that can be easily swallowed. It’s always good to be aware of any signs and symptoms of gastrointestinal blockage in dogs, as well as how to prevent it from happening to your pet.

I am neither a veterinarian nor a medical professional. The information in this article has been researched and sourced at the end of the post if required. All safety and medical issues or questions regarding your pet’s health or symptoms should always be brought to the attention of your veterinarian for clarification, assessment, advice and treatment.

What items Cause Gastrointestinal Blockage?

There are many items that can get stuck in the stomach, intestines and colon. If the object is not able to be dissolved or broken down by the stomach acids, or is too large to get through the intestinal tract, it becomes lodged.  At this point the object cannot move up to be vomited out or down to be passed through and released through the colon.  Although any object your dog swallows can be a danger, some of the most common items found lodged in the intestinal tracts of many dogs are:

– hair ties

– socks

– underwear

– facecloths/towels

– small stuffed toys

– corn cobs

– string, ribbon or rope

– rocks

– sticks

– broken or small chew toys

– rawhide

– bones

What Should you Do If You See Your Dog Swallow Something He Shouldn’t?

This post may contain affiliate links.  Although we may make a small commission it is at no cost to you.  See “Disclosure and Legal Things” section for complete details.

If you see your dog swallow something that is not dog food, you should get him to a vet immediately. Your vet may be able to help the dog to bring up the foreign object before it travels down to a location that will require surgical removal. 

NOTE:  Never induce vomiting without the advice and guidance of a veterinarian.  If you don’t perform the process properly, it could result in your dog asphyxiating should the item become lodged in the throat on the way out.

Signs and Symptoms of Gastrointestinal blockage:

Sometimes our little friends find things that we don’t see and scoop them up without our even knowing it. When this happens, if we are lucky, whatever they have swallowed will pass naturally. 

One of my family members has two Burnese Mountain dogs. One day, after she had let them out in the yard to do their business, she went out to clean up the mess and found an entire mini skirt mixed in with the “pile”.  It seemed funny at the time, but it could have been a very different, very NOT funny outcome if the skirt had become entangled in the intestines.

So how do we know if something is stuck?  There are a number of physical symptoms that could indicate blockage.

  • Vomiting food, bile or fluids
  • Lack of appetite
  • Stomach appears enlarged or bloated
  • Slow, listless, lethargic behavior
  • Diarrhea or constipation (depending on where the blockage is)
  • Dehydration
  • Stomach pain when touched
  • Whimpering or showing other signs of physical discomfort

If you see any of these signs or other unusual behaviour you should have your dog examined by a veterinarian to rule out potentially deadly blockage.

Why do dogs eat non-food items?

Many dogs, especially puppies, will eat anything within range. This is simply curiousity and exploration.  For older dogs, it is often because they are chewing on something they shouldn’t.  Bones, sticks, rawhide or chew toys that are either too small or not durable enough, among other things.  Generally, anything that can fit in your dog’s throat, has strings or has a tendency to splinter, should not be available to your dog.  It’s just too dangerous.

Some dogs actually crave or seek out certain inedible things to chew on.  This is a condition called Pica. While Pica can be a habitual tendency, it can sometimes be brought on by emotional issues, a change in diet or new stresses, including new pet, new baby or owners being stressed.  . 

Your dog may have never had this issue before, but can evolve at any time.

How Can you prevent your dog from eating non-food items?

One of the best ways to prevent your dog from ingesting dangerous items is to remove them from the dog’s reach.  This may not be as easy as it sounds, depending in your doggo’s chewing preferences.

Supervise your dog when he is playing with his toys to be sure he isn’t being too aggressive.  This will prevent breaking the toy and swallowing the broken pieces.

Hair ties, socks, string, bones, dangerous chew toys and rawhide can be removed easily. If you have young children, you should make sure that their toys are out of reach.  A Barbie shoe or toy blocks can cause serious harm to your dog.

Find ways to keep your dog entertained.  Providing him with toys that keep him busy will keep your dog distracted.  He will not be as interested in chewing on the dangerous items.

Provide durable toys to limit breakage that leads to swallowing pieces. Supervise your dog when he is playing with his toys to be sure he isn’t being too aggressive.  This will prevent breaking the toy and swallowing the broken pieces.

Make toy inspection part of your daily routine.  Ensure that all toys are in good shape and remove any that are damaged or broken.

But what if your dog chews on wires?                          

Wires are all over your house.  They can’t be taken away but they can be hidden and kept out of reach. Some ways to achieve this are:

  • Make sure all wires are tucked in behind furniture where possible.
  • If your wires are exposed, you should try purchasing a durable protective cover to wrap the wires in.  This will make them less inviting as well as more difficult to chew through.
  • Put away your electronic chargers after use.  Where possible, charge these devices on an out-of-reach table or counter.
  • Purchase a deterrent spray. Remember that this is a deterrent, not a fool proof plan.  See how it works for your pet before leaving the dogs unsupervised. CAUTION: BE SURE THAT THE SPRAY YOU CHOOSE IS SAFE FOR ALL OF THE PETS ON YOUR HOME, NOT JUST YOUR DOG!

Summary

When you have a dog in the house, you never know what might be chewed or swallowed.  The best way to avoid dangerous ingestion of non food items is prevention. 

Be aware of any unusual behavior.  Monitor for the signs listed above if you think your dog may have swallowed something.  Most importantly, if you suspect that your dog may have consumed anything other than dog-safe food, get him to a vet as soon as possible.

Eusoh Cool

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Why Caring for Your Dog’s Nails is an Important Health Issue

Failing to keep your dog’s nails at the proper length can cause discomfort, pain and even permanent damage to your dog’s feet, legs and back.

As a dog walker, I have seen a lot of paws with nails that desperately needed to be trimmed. I’ve seen dogs slip and slide on floors and I have seen dew claws hanging and bleeding. I decided to learn more about the importance of nail trimming and how caring for your dog’s nails is an important health issue.

I am neither a veterinarian nor a medical professional. The information in this article has been researched and sourced at the end of the post if required. All safety and medical issues or questions regarding your pet’s health or symptoms should always be brought to the attention of your veterinarian for clarification, assessment, advice and treatment.

I discovered that it is just as important as having his regular check up, his heartworm medication and his flea and tick treatments.  Failing to keep your dog’s nails at the proper length can cause discomfort, pain and even permanent damage to your dog’s feet, legs and back.

How often should you trim your dog’s nails?

A general rule for trimming your dog’s nails is to do it every four weeks.  Having said that, different dogs have different needs.

Dogs who walk a lot, especially on concrete, will wear down his nails naturally.  It may be months before he needs a trim, whereas dog who spends most of his time in the house or only going out into the back yard will not have the same wear on his nails.  This dog may need his nails cared for more frequently.

How do you know when it’s time to trim your dog’s nails?

One of the best ways to know when it’s time for a doggy manicure is by inspecting the nails when your dog is standing.  The nail should not be touching the ground.  You should be able to see a space between the nail and the floor.

The best ways to know when it’s time for a doggy manicure is by inspecting the length of the nails. These nails are too long and require a trim.

Another clear indication that it’s time for a trim is when you can hear a clicking noise when your dog walks on the floor.  If you can hear them coming because of the tick tick tick on the floor, you should break out the nail clippers, or if you prefer, head off to your groomer.

If you have slippery floors, a dog will lose his grip when his nails are too long.  You will notice him slipping when running on the floor, trying to stop or going around corners.  If you notice your dog is having trouble keeping his balance when walking on any smooth surface, check his nails to be sure they haven’t grown too long.

Always check the front and back nails. Often the back nails will be much shorter than the front. This is because dogs walk by pushing off with their hind legs.  The back feet are subjected to much more wear and tear when the dog pushes forward from the back legs.

This post may contain affiliate links.  Although we may make a small commission it is at no cost to you.  See “Disclosure and Legal Things” section for complete details.

How is it dangerous if you don’t trim your dog’s nails?

If you let your dog’s nails grow too long, the nail begins to touch the floor.  When this happens, the toe is pushed upward and your dog’s step is changed.  This puts pressure on every part of the foot and leg.  The tendons are stretched and the bones are forced into an unnatural position.  When your dog’s step is changed it can cause leg, hip and back pain.  If nails are regularly left too long, the foot, leg and spine can become permanently damaged.

Another way that nail growth can harm your dog is when they get so long that they begin to curl.  A nail left to grow can actually curl under the foot and grow back into the pad of the foot.  Aside from the obvious pain this would cause, the difficulty it would create for your dog to walk and the permanent bone and tendon damage that would develop, the nails can cause serious infections in the foot. Removal at this stage can cause mild to significant bleeding and, if infected, drainage.

You would be best to have your vet remove a nail that has grown into a pad as it may be necessary to stop the bleeding or sterilize the open wound.

Why it’s Imperative that you trim your dog’s dew claws

Dew claws don’t touch the ground, so they can’t cause any damage, right?  Wrong.  Dew claws are very vulnerable.  They are often left out of a nail trim and become curled as described above, but they can also get caught on things when your dog is walking or playing.  If the dew claw gets ripped off or broken, it will cause a lot of pain for your doggo.  There will probably be significant bleeding.  It can become infected, so a trip to the vet for a thorough inspection is strongly advised.

The best way to prevent damage to dew claws is to keep them trimmed short enough that they don’t get caught on anything.

Clipping your dog’s nails

Many dogs do not like having their nails trimmed.  It can become a struggle if you are unable to get them to relax.  If this is the case with your pup, you may want to have the trim done by a groomer or at your vet’s office.

If you decide to trim your dog’s nails on your own, be sure to use proper nail clippers for dogs and NOT HOUSEHOLD SCISSORS!!!

Clipping Light Colored Nails vs. Black nails

Dogs with light colored nails are less difficult to do on your own.  You can clearly see where the white part of the nail ends and the pink part of the quick begins.  If you cut the quick it will be painful for your dog and it will bleed. Always stay on the white area. If you are uncomfortable or your dog is moving too much, find a groomer or a vet to do the job.  They are very experienced and you can avoid an unpleasant situation for our dog.

If you do try it on your own, be sure to have Styptic Powder close by. Should you accidentally cut the edge of the quick, you can apply the powder to stop the bleeding. Your dog will, however, still experience the pain

Black nails are much more difficult.  You cannot see the quick and it is much more difficult to avoid it.  There are nail clippers on the market now that have an LED light that allows you to see the quick.  The vet or a professional groomer may be your better option with black nails, but if you choose to do it yourself you may want to try the LED Clippers.

There is one other tool that will help if you are concerned about cutting the nails too short, or the dog moving quickly and having an accident occur.  It’s called a dremel.  It is a rotating file that grinds the nail down until it’s the length that is best for your dog. It does not hurt the nail or the quick. Your dog may take a few trims to get used to the feeling, but it can really help to reduce the risk of cutting a quick. 

Note:

The more frequently you trim your dog’s nails, the shorter the quick will be.  If your dogs quicks are already long, you can shorten them with frequent trims.  The quick will begin to recede and you will be able to cut your dog’s nails shorter. This will make them easier to maintain and your dog will be comfortable walking.

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Are Acorns Toxic for Dogs?

If your dog consumes acorns or oak leaves, you may see varying signs of digestive upset. Here are some signs to look for:

I recently read a post on Facebook that said a puppy had been rushed to the vet after ingesting an acorn.  My first reaction was that the dog must have choked on it, but it turns out that the acorn had poisoned the puppy.  I had never heard anything like this so I went on a search to find out if acorns are toxic for dogs.

I am neither a veterinarian nor a medical professional. The information in this article has been researched and sourced at the end of the post if required. All safety and medical issues or questions regarding your pet’s health or symptoms should always be brought to the attention of your veterinarian for clarification, assessment, advice and treatment.

 This post may contain affiliate links.  Although we may make a small commission it is at no cost to you.  See “Disclosure and Legal Things” section for complete details.

I was surprised to learn that Oak Trees are dangerous to dogs as well as other animals. The leaves and acorns contain a chemical called Quercitannic acid which is a form of tannic acid.  Generally, the amount of leaves or acorns ingested in relation to the size of the dog, determines the amount of damage the toxins will do.

What happens if my dog eats Acorns or Oak Leaves?

If your dog consumes acorns or oak leaves, you may see varying signs of digestive upset. Here are some signs to look for:

Keeping your dog on a leash in unfamiliar areas will help you to control where and what your dog investigates.  You will see the oak trees or their droppings and you will be able to guide your dog away from any danger.
Keeping your dog on a leash in unfamiliar areas will help you to control where and what your dog investigates.  You will see the oak trees or their droppings and you will be able to guide your dog away from any danger.

Vomiting

Diarrhea

Weakness/Fatigue

Stomach Pain

Gagging

Unexplained drooling

NOTE: SEVERE POISONING COULD RESULT IN KIDNEY DAMAGE, LIVER DAMAGE AND POSSIBLY DEATH

These symptoms will usually occur within a few hours of consumption.  Generally, a larger dog would have to consume a lot more than a small breed or puppy to develop severe symptoms. This is not to say that a large dog won’t develop severe symptoms.  Should a large dog have a weaker digestive system, or an underlying medical condition, the reaction may be more severe than expected. It is important to monitor your dog’s symptoms closely. Should you see any new or worsening symptoms, you should relay this information to your vet immediately.

Can acorns hurt large dogs as well as small dogs?

A Great Dane or a Yorkie that consumes only one acorn, can develop some pretty significant medical issues.  Even of the toxicity is very mild, your dog should be examined by a veterinarian. There are other concerns when it comes to ingesting acorns, beyond the toxicity. 

Choking

If a dog swallows an acorn, it can be a choking hazard.  Should the item become lodged in the throat in can obstruct the airway. If he cannot cough it up, or is not breathing at all you will have to perform the Heimlich Maneuver to remove it.  I have attached a link to Texas A&M University of Veterinary Medicine which describes how to perform the Heimlich Maneuver on a dog in various positions.  It is important to become familiar with these processes should you ever need to use them.

Texas A&M University of Veterinary Medicine: Heimlich Maneuver

Blockage in the Intestinal Tract

An acorn does not break down easily. Similar to a corn cob or a small toy, the acorn can lodge itself in the intestinal tract. Once this happens, your dog will not be able to properly digest food.  Sometimes it can take months for symptoms of blockage to develop.  Once an object is lodged in the intestinal tract, surgery may be required to remove it. 

How can I keep my dog from eating acorns?

The best form of prevention is to avoid contact with Oak trees while on walks or in your yard.  If you have an Oak tree on your property, it may be a good idea to fence off the area around the tree where leaves or acorns may fall.

Another option would be to put your dog on a lead in the yard that keeps him out of reach of the tree.

The best idea would be to stay in the yard with your dog and observe his activities.  While it’s good to let your dog sniff, you must make sure you can see everything he is sniffing and ensure he does not pick up any foreign objects.

Training your dog to “Drop it” and “Stop/Stay” will help if you are suddenly in a position where you are around an oak tree.  If you are hiking, you may not know what trees are in the area.  Teach your dog to respond to the stop command before he finds himself in a dangerous area. Responding to “drop it” for anything that he has scooped off of the ground will help to avoid swallowing dangerous items.

Keeping your dog on a leash in unfamiliar areas will help you to control where and what your dog investigates. You will see the oak trees or their droppings and you will be able to guide your dog away from any danger.

If you know that your dog has eaten any oak tree products, you should get him to the vet immediately. The veterinarian will advise you of the best course of action. 

Sources:

https://www.banfield.com/pet-healthcare/additional-resources/ask-a-vet/is-it-harmful-for-my-dog-to#:~:text=Is%20it%20harmful%20for%20my%20dog%20to%20eat%20acorns%20that,internal%20damage%2C%20and%20kidney%20disease

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3276711/Acorns-deadly-dogs-vets-warned-Harmless-looking-nuts-make-pets-seriously-ill-kill.html

https://www.vets-now.com/pet-care-advice/acorns-and-dogs/

https://inexpensivetreecare.com/blog/trees-may-toxic-pets/

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3276711/Acorns-deadly-dogs-vets-warned-Harmless-looking-nuts-make-pets-seriously-ill-kill.html

https://www.petmd.com/dog/emergency/common-emergencies/e_dg_swallowed_objects

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Using Music to Calm an Anxious Dog

Using music to calm an anxious dog has proven to be as as effective as it is for humans. It reduces blood pressure and stress.

Many dogs suffer from anxiety.  Some breeds are more prone to the condition, but many have developed high levels of anxiety or separation anxiety through circumstances in their living conditions. Many rescues have experienced abuse by a previous owner. Others have become fearful of noises or sudden movements through their experiences while living on the street.  Using music to calm an anxious dog has proven to be very effective. 

Using music to calm an anxious dog has proven to be as as effective as it is for humans. It reduces blood pressure and stress.

When I adopted my rescue dog, Zorro, he had spent his very young life in and abusive situation.  When he was only a few months old, he was rescued and sent to stay with a foster mom until a sponsor was found to bring him to Canada. The foster mom spent three months caring for Zorro.  She was an excellent source of information when he was transitioning to his new life in my home. She explained that he did not do well in the crate, so she would use spa music to help him to calm down when she had to leave him.  This information has come in very handy a number of times since we brought him home two years ago.

Be Aware of what Causes Your Dog’s Anxiety

This post may contain affiliate links.  Although we may make a small commission it is at no cost to you.  See “Disclosure and Legal Things” section for complete details.

Although he was a very happy guy, there were some definite signs of anxiety in a number of situations.  Separation anxiety was one of the most difficult challenges for him.  The three people in my home worked on a variety of schedules and, because of this, Zorro was rarely alone for more than an hour or two.

When we would leave him, he would bark and cry. We purchased a Furbo Dog Camera so that we could see what was upsetting him, but there was nothing unusual.  He would face the door and howl or bark, pace the floor and start again.  The Furbo notified us when he was barking.  This allowed us to speak to him from wherever we were.  This helped him a lot, but we wanted to prevent the anxiety as opposed to calming it.  We began leaving the radio on for him and saw a big change in his stress levels.

Music Masks Environmental Noise

I am neither a veterinarian nor a medical professional. The information in this article has been researched and sourced at the end of the post if required. All safety and medical issues or questions regarding your pet’s health or symptoms should always be brought to the attention of your veterinarian for clarification, assessment, advice and treatment.

Zorro, like many other dogs, struggles with sounds from lawn mowers, snow blowers, construction tools and, of course, fireworks. We always leave the radio or TV on for him so he doesn’t feel alone. The “white noise” effect reduces his exposure to outside activity. The music or conversation from the television provide a familiar and soothing distraction.

Music is Not Just a Distraction for Dogs

It has been proven that music reduces stress in humans, and it has the same effect for dogs.  The flow of the music helps to reduce heart rate and blood pressure.  The physical response on the body encourages both mental and physical relaxation.  Your dog’s body will relax, taking down or eliminating the levels of anxiety. 

What Kind of Music is Best to Calm Your Dog

Just like people, your dog may respond to one type of music more than another.  It is a personal preference.  In most cases, classical music is recommended.  The light, flowing consistency of classical music seems to have a more soothing effect than something with a rapid or loud beat.  

We witnessed an immediate reaction to spa music with Zorro. We were on a road trip to the east coast for our family vacation.  Zorro loves the car and has travelled this road before, but something out of the ordinary happened on this trip.  We had been driving, and of course taking breaks, for about 9 hours, when Zorro became very agitated.

We had been listening to music along the way, so we tried turning it off for a few minutes. Our thought was that we were disturbing his sleep.  As it was 3:00 am we thought we may have been disrupting his sleep routine.  He was still unhappy.  We stopped and took him for a walk to stretch his legs and pee, and we offered some food and water.  He seemed fine after about 20 minutes, so we got back into the car.  He immediately began whining and turning around in his spot.

Remembering that his foster mom would use spa music to calm him, my daughter searched her song lists, found some spa music and we put it on for him.  It was like magic.  He stopped whining, turned around three times in his seat, curled up and went to sleep.  It was actually an incredible thing to watch.

Since then, whenever Zorro shows any sign of stress, we pull out the spa playlist or turn on the spa music channel on the TV. This either calms him immediately or significantly reduces his stress levels.

A Musician has Written a Song to Calm Anxious Dogs

A musician by the name of Garrett Charles Nash (Gnash) who rescued a dog with significant anxiety issues, researched the music theory to help his dog.  He found that certain rhythms helped dogs to settle down.  He has written a song called A Song for Daisy to help his dog that has been used in shelters to soothe dogs that suffer with anxiety issues. The song is 15 minutes long and incorporates a simple melody with a lot of repetition.

His work, along with my own experiences with my rescue dog, has proven that music therapy can significantly reduce a dog’s stress and anxiety levels.

Should your dog have difficulty with separation anxiety, noise reactivity or maybe she is always stressed, music therapy may be a good place to start. 

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