Why Choose an Indoor Potty for Dogs?

Most dog owners would benefit from having an indoor dog potty on hand. It can save your floors and carpets, but more importantly, it can save your dog from physical and mental stress.

Many dog owners have chosen to use the indoor potty option while training their puppy, but once they are trained the pee pads go away and they move on to daily walks or being let out into the backyard to do their business.  Unfortunately, these options are not always easy for many pet owners.  There are many reasons why dog owners choose an indoor potty for dogs.

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When Indoor Potties are Essential:

I am neither a veterinarian nor a medical professional. The information in this article has been researched and sourced at the end of the post if required. All safety and medical issues or questions regarding your pet’s health or symptoms should always be brought to the attention of your veterinarian for clarification, assessment, advice and treatment.

When Humans are Senior Citizens or Have a Physical Impairment

Many dog owners are not able to walk several times a day. Some may not even be able to walk once.  Hiring a dog walker is a great option, but can get expensive when the dog needs to go out several time daily.  Having an indoor potty allows the dog to relieve himself as needed and the owner to feel satisfied that their dog is not uncomfortable.

If Your Dog Is Sick

If your dog is ill or on medication, she may need more frequent trips outside.  When you are working and away from home for several hours a day, it is important that your dog has options.  Hiring a dog walker is a good way to break up the day, but if the illness or medication to fix the illness, causes frequent urination or diarrhea, it may be best to provide your dog with an alternate option that is comfortable.

Senior Dog

As dogs age, they may have difficulty holding it the way they did when they were younger.  Just like humans, bladder leakage and frequent need to void their bladder is a real and common issue.  Having an indoor potty option will help to relieve the stress associated with waiting for you to wake up, or return from work.

Long work days

Life happens.  Even if you have a dog walker coming once or twice a day, there may be some days when you are leaving your doggo for longer than you intend to.  Meetings, deadlines, traffic, public transportation delays, snow storms or whatever other interruption may happen throughout the course of your day, can cause you to be held up.  An indoor potty offers the option that both you and your dog will appreciate.

Condo/Apartment Life

Living on the 34th floor provides a beautiful view, but accessing the elevator and getting outside with a dog who hasn’t been out all night can be a cause for accidents to happen.  Puppies have little control and seniors are in similar situations.  Your dog still needs to be walked, but at least he will not be placed in a difficult situation waiting for several minutes trying to get out of the building.

Weather Restrictions

Weather can affect a dog’s ability to be outside. Some breeds have difficulty with extreme temperatures.  In extreme heat or humidity, it becomes difficult for dogs like pugs or bull dogs to breath. Alternatively, a chihuahua might struggle in extreme cold.  During these times, walking may not be an option and your dog may be better off staying inside to do his business.

Messes on the floor are never pleasant to clean, but they are not the worst part of the accident.  Before a trained dog will let go of his bladder or bowels in the house, he has probably held it until he was in physical pain. Holding it for too long could also lead to a urinary tract infection that would cause him to have difficulty holding it for several days. Psychologically, the dog immediately feels guilty.  Now they have experienced both a physical and mental struggle. 

Having an indoor potty as an option for your dog offers freedom for everyone.  It should never take the place of regular play and exercise, but there are many circumstances where they are beneficial for everyone involved.

Indoor Potty Options for Various Sizes of Dogs

Small dogs have a number of indoor potty options to choose from.  Because of their size, they can use something as small as a kitty litter box or a dog potty tray.  If they are trained to use this method at a young age, they learn that this is normal.  For those who are unable to walk their dogs, this is a great alternative.  A very small dog can get plenty of exercise in a relatively small space, and special toys and sniffing games can be offered within the house to provide plenty of mental and physical stimulation. 

Indoor dog potties excellent for temporary situations like puppy training and recovery from illness or surgery.

Many choose to use disposable pee pads.  They are quick to clean up, easy to maintain and disposable. They are absorbent enough for small bladders and relatively inexpensive. Pee Pads are also excellent for temporary situations like puppy training and recovery from illness or surgery.

Washable pee pads are reusable and are good for training as well as permanent use for small through large dogs.

Indoor turf patches placed on a potty tray provide a more natural alternative to the pee pads.  The tray catches any overflow. The turf patches can be replaced as needed. They are offered in all sizes.

If you are looking for something more permanent, you may want to subscribe to Doggy Lawn.  It’s an actual patch of grass that is sent to you at intervals that suit your needs. Simply replace the patch and disposed of the soiled patch.  It is as natural as the grass in the park and comes in a variety of sizes, so even your extra-large dog will be comfortable using it.

Because the grass is real, this is a very eco-friendly option.

For people with more space in their home, there are large litter boxes that are suitable for both male and female large dogs. 

Summary

Most pet parents’circumstances fit into one of the categories listed above. This means that most dog owners would benefit from having an indoor dog potty on hand. It can save your floors and carpets, but more importantly, it can save your dog from physical and mental stress. You and your dog will appreciate it.

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What to Do When Dogs Fear Face Masks

When dogs fear face masks it can be traumatizing just to go for their daily walks.

As the world changes and people begin to come out of isolation, we will be changing many of our daily habits and routines.  One of the most common new things is that many will be wearing face masks to protect themselves and others.  While we are learning to adapt and communicate with our faces covered, our dogs may be very confused by the inability to see facial expressions.  Dogs may be stressed when they see people sporting their new fashion masks.  So, what do we do?  When dogs fear face masks it can be very traumatic when passing someone on the street or when her owner walks in the door looking like Darth Vader.  I found a few hints and tips to help your doggo adapt and to feel comfortable with this new reality.

This post may contain affiliate links.  Although we may make a small commission it is at no cost to you.  See “Disclosure and Legal Things” section for complete details.

Tip #1:  Make masks a common household item.

If you have a few masks (or even just one), you can leave them around the house in plain sight.  Placing them in areas that are familiar to your dog including her sleeping area, hanging from a chair in the kitchen or dining room, on the hook where you hang your keys or even wrapped around her treat bag.  By placing the masks where your dog can see them, they become routine, day to day items.  This will offer some familiarity and reduce the element of surprise.

Tip #2:  Let him sniff the mask.

If you hold the mask and let him sniff it, he can see that it is just another object and not something to be guarded against or feared.  Becoming acquainted with the unknown can ease stress.

Tip #3:  Put your mask on in front of your dog.

If you put your mask on in one room and then walk into the room where your dog is, he may be shocked or outright scared.  Remove the element of surprise by putting the mask on while your dog watches.  She will see the transition from the real you to the masked you and the transition will be smoother.  By seeing that it’s you “getting dressed” the level of fear will be reduced.

Tip #4:  Wear your mask around the house.

Now that your dog has watched you put the mask on, try wearing it around the house.  Wear it while you play a game of fetch. Enjoy a brief training session or a belly rub with your mask on. By doing this she will make the correlation that masks are for good times.  Just wearing it around the house while going about your day, will make the mask common place.

Tip #5:  Use treats to associate a potentially scary thing with a positive thing.

If you give your dog a treat when you hold the mask, when you put it on or when you are wearing it, he will associate the mask with good things.  When you are walking your dog and he sees other humans with their masks on, have some treats ready before you cross paths. As you and your pup approach people you can give your dog a small treat before the shock or fear of seeing the masked people occurs.

Note:  Dogs will not be able to read facial expressions through the mask.  They will only see eyes.  Using soft praise, gentle tones and attempt to make your eyes speak rather than your smile. It will help you to communicate with your pup in a new way.

When dogs fear face masks you can help by having a small treat ready on your walks. You can give him one before approaching masked people.

Not all dogs will be afraid.  Some won’t even be fazed by the change.  Those that are nervous, new to your household and adapting, coming from bad situations or who are just generally skittish will need some extra time to get used to the changes going on around them. When dogs fear face masks it can be traumatizing just to go for their daily walks. By using the ideas listed above, you can help to make this transition a pleasant one.

I am neither a veterinarian nor a medical professional. The information in this article has been researched and sourced at the end of the post. All medical issues or questions regarding your pet’s health or symptoms should always be brought to the attention of your veterinarian for clarification, assessment, advice and treatment.

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Why is My Dog’s Stomach Gurgling?

Gurgling, also known as borborygmi or Borborygmus, occurs when the dog’s digestive system is processing food. Quiet noises coming from the abdomen are normal. Louder noises can be normal as well, or they can be a symptom of something more serious.

The other night I woke when my dog became restless.  Zorro rarely wakes in the night so I was a bit concerned, although he seemed fine.  He had some water and got back in bed.  Then I heard my dog’s stomach gurgling.  It was quite loud.  He was having trouble sleeping so I thought maybe he had to go out.  I let him out in the yard, but after several minutes he still hadn’t done anything and was happy to go back inside.  After returning to bed, his stomach was still rumbling quite loudly.  I massaged his tummy for a while and he fell asleep.  Unfortunately, I did not.  I was very concerned as to what was causing the discomfort and what I could do to help.  Because I was concerned that this could be something serious I decided to get up and do some research.

This post may contain affiliate links.  Although we may make a small commission it is at no cost to you.  See “Disclosure and Legal Things” section for complete details.

What is gurgling?

Gurgling, also known as Borborygmi or Borborygmus, occurs when the dog’s digestive system is processing food.  It occurs in animals just as it does in humans.  The food is chewed and swallowed and then begins its journey through the stomach and intestines.  It’s during this process that gurgling happens.  Quiet noises coming from the abdomen are normal.  Louder noises can be normal as well, or they can be a symptom of something more serious.

I am neither a veterinarian nor medical professional. The information in this article has been researched and sourced at the end of the post. All medical issues or questions regarding your pet’s health or symptoms should always be brought to the attention of your veterinarian for clarification, assessment, advice and treatment.

When is gurgling considered normal?

There are a number of circumstances which cause gurgling that are not a cause for serious concern.  These include:

  • Regular Digestion
  • Gas
  • Air passing through the system
  • Eating something that didn’t agree with your dog
  • General hunger

If your dog has recently eaten, she may have swallowed some air while eating.  This air may be moving around in the digestive tract and causing the sounds.  If she has lapped up water very quickly, there may be excessive air, which would create larger air pockets, thus causing louder noises as it moves its way through.  This generally does not cause pain or distress.

If she has eaten something that doesn’t agree with her, such as something she found on the street, she may be having a mild reaction to it. If her food has changed and she hasn’t adjusted yet, it can create some discomfort, just as it could in a human. Either of these situations can also cause gas. Usually, this will pass through and she will feel better soon.

It may simply be that your dog is hungry.  The body continues to process anything remaining in the digestive tract, but if there are little or no contents in the intestines, the system is only processing air and liquids. This is when the louder gurgling begins.  Once she eats, the body should adjust to the normal routine.

When you should be concerned:
A dog’s stomach gurgling is usually not serious, but if accompanied by other symptoms such as vomiting or diarrhea, it can be cause for concern.

If you see any of these symptoms in your dog, you should take her to a vet immediately.  There may be something more serious going on:

  • Reduced appetite
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Lethargic
  • Swollen stomach
  • Restlessness

Sometimes these symptoms can indicate a blockage or partial blockage in the intestines.  Your dog may have swallowed something around the house, outside in the yard or even on a walk with you.  If the object doesn’t move, food cannot pass through normally.  Because some or all of the food that your dog has eaten remains in the digestive system, she feels full and will not eat.  The small amount that does pass through will be mostly liquid, resulting in diarrhea. Depending on where the blockage is located, any food that has been consumed may be regurgitated (vomited).  A lack of food and nutrition will cause lethargy. Vomiting and diarrhea will rapidly cause dehydration and should be treated as quickly as possible.  Intestinal blockage is very serious and requires immediate medical attention.

If you notice that your dog’s tummy is swollen (blown up like a balloon) and that she seems to be having trouble settling down, this could indicate a condition called Bloat.  This is very serious and requires immediate medical attention.

Summary

Gurgling, on its own, can be caused by a number of circumstances, most of which are harmless and will go away within 24 to 48 hours.  If the gurgling is accompanied by any other symptoms, you should have your dog examined by a vet.  There may be a more serious underlying condition that needs to be addressed with medication or even surgery.  It is important not to wait if your dog is in any discomfort or distress as time may be of the essence.

Follow up on my dog’s condition:

Two days after the gurgling incident, Zorro woke several times in the night and eventually he vomited. A few hours later he had an episode of extreme diarrhea.  I made a vet appointment immediately.  He was put on a special diet for three days and has been given some medicine to coat his stomach in case of irritation.  The vet wants me to collect stool samples over the next few days to be analyzed. 

There has been no more vomiting.  We are keeping a close eye on him to be sure there are no further issues. So far Zorro is eating, sleeping and playing well and is almost back to his old self.

Sources:

https://www.petmd.com/dog/general-health/dog-stomach-noises-what-do-they-mean

https://www.dogster.com/dog-health-care/why-is-dogs-stomach-making-noises

https://www.preventivevet.com/dogs/help-my-dogs-stomach-is-bloated-understanding-canine-bloat-torsion-and-gdv

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