GPS Trackers for Dogs and Cats

It’s always better to be safe than sorry. If you have a pet who is deaf, a flight risk, new to you and your home or fearful. If you are travelling with your doggo or just driving around your home town, keeping a tracker on her will bring peace of mind.

So, you have your pet microchipped, why would you need GPS trackers for dogs and cats? A microchip is perfect if your pet has been found and the good Samaritan who found her does his due diligence and takes her to a vet or shelter to have the chip scanned. In a perfect world, this would be enough. Unfortunately, not all pets are lost in an area where a human is likely to find them and not all humans are willing to go through the process of picking up a stray animal and going through the process. Some will even keep the found pet for themselves. These scenarios call for a tracker so that you can go to your pet, rather than hoping she will be returned to you.

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What should I look for in a tracker?

Many tracking devices offer similar functions that are key to bringing your doggo home. The three most important features that I have come across are battery life, range of coverage and that it be waterproof. It is the combination of these three features that provides the highest chance of a successful reunion.

Battery Life and Charging:

The battery life should be no less than a couple of days. You will need to have enough time to get to your pet once she is located. If she accidentally becomes stuck in a vehicle and transported to a different city, you need time to reach her. If she is lost in the woods, you may need time to hike to her location. You will need a battery that provides you with ample time to do so.

A minimal charging time is important as it ensures that she will not be without her tracker for too long. You can charge it while you are all inside and be sure that she is wearing the collar before anyone opens the door to head out to enjoy your day. If you are driving it is best to keep the tracker on in case of an accident. Often, an accident situation results in a dog bolting from the scene because she is afraid or, even worse, injured. Having the tracker on her will help you to get to her and care for her as soon as possible.

Range of Coverage:

Having a tracker that has a limited tracking range limits your chances of bringing your pet home. There are several trackers out there that have many wonderful features, but can only be used within a limited number of kilometres/miles. This is great if she doesn’t get far, but as in the scenario where she gets stuck in a vehicle and driven down the highway, this could render the tracker useless. There are some that only provide coverage within a specific country. This seems like plenty of range, but if you are travelling or live close to a border, your dog could travel across the border and you would lose the ability to track her beyond a certain point.

Waterproof:

Dogs swim, dogs roll in mud puddles, dogs run in the rain. A tracker that will withstand being wet will ensure that you can maintain a solid connection between your app and your pet regardless of where she goes. until you are able to catch up with her and bring her home safely. It also provides the opportunity to take your pet to the beach without having to remove the tracking device, putting your pet at risk of running around unmonitored.

Many believe that their pup will never run far from them. Although this may seem like the case, circumstances come into play that can cause your pet to become lost. A frightening noise could cause her to hide. She may chase a squirrel until she doesn’t recognize her surroundings. Some run into situations, like sleeping in the bed of a truck that suddenly begins to move. Others may swim out too far from shore. Any of these can take them far from home. Wearing a tracker on will help you pinpoint her exact location so that you can get to her sooner.

These may sound like unlikely scenarios, but they do happen more often than we think.

It’s always better to be safe than sorry. If your pet is deaf, a flight risk, new to you and your home or fearful, you should consider a tracker. When travelling or just driving around your neighborhood, keeping a tracker on your pup will bring peace of mind.

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Microchipping Your Pets

It is a small chip that is similar in size to a grain of rice. It is programmed with a number that is assigned to your pet along with the phone number of the company that issued the chip. Should your pet be found outside, the vet can wave a scanner over the location of the chip and the phone number and pet number appear on the scanning device.

You never think it will happen to you. You open the door and your pet bolts out before you have a chance to stop him. As I walk through the various neighborhoods with my Doggos, I see so many lost animal signs on posts, fences, mail boxes – anywhere a desperate pet parent thinks there is a chance that someone might have seen their dog or cat. Animal shelters and vets continuously receive calls from frantic and desperate people who have lost their pets. They see animals daily who have been found and brought to them in hopes that someone will be reunited with their beloved family pet. There are times when these methods work, but all too often, they are not enough and the animal has to be re-homed, or worse. Microchipping your pets will help to identify them should they be found.

This post may contain affiliate links.  Although we may make a small commission it is at no cost to you.  See “Disclosure and Legal Things” section for complete details.

My dog has tags on his collar

For years, the best method of attempting to make sure your pet would be returned has been a tag on his collar. The tag provided the pet’s name and your phone number. If your pet was found, hopefully the person would be honest enough to call and return him, or at least bring him to an animal care worker to have them contact you. This has been somewhat effective, but there are circumstances where this fails. As we have discussed in my post Collar vs. Harness, using a collar all the time can be unsafe unless you are using a break-away style. This means that if your dog bolts from the home, he may not be wearing a collar or the collar may come off if he gets hooked on something while running around outside. This is where the microchip could be the best alternative.

What is a Microchip?

It is a small chip that is similar in size to a grain of rice. It is programmed with a number that is assigned to your pet along with the phone number of the company that issued the chip. When your pet is found, a veterinarian can wave a scanner over the location of the chip. The phone number and pet number appear on the scanning device. The vet then calls the phone number and provides them with your pet’s ID number found in the chip. The number is run through a database and your contact information is provided. The vet can then contact you and tell you where to come and pick up your fur baby.

How is the Microchip Inserted?

The microchip comes in a large syringe (needle) that the vet inserts between your pet’s shoulder blades. There is some fatty tissue in that area that allows it to sit comfortably, and your pet will not feel it once it has been placed. It is made of a material that allows it to attach itself to the tissues, keeping it firmly in place.

Does it hurt?

Because the need is larger than a normal needle, the initial injection does hurt more than a vaccination. Some vets will freeze the area before insertion, but many do it without it. The process is extremely quick and your pet’s reaction is very brief, indicating that the pain is minimal. There may be a trace amount of bleeding at the site and a small scab is possible.

As always, discuss this and every other medical process with your vet. Pet care is a very personal decision and the best practice for your pet may not be the same as it is for someone else’s. You are already doing your research by reading about microchipping. Make a list of any questions or concerns before you see the vet and have them answered before you proceed. If you are comfortable with the answers you can make your decision with confidence.

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